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People care about corruption, contrary to recent reports

A headline on the Aug. 12 Buffalo News stated, “Poll shows few are following state corruption issue.” The headline for the relevant article stated, “Corruption issue draws little N.Y. voter interest.” I read the article and I read the questions and the results of the Siena Research Institute survey, including the small print that stated the survey covered 863 likely New York State voters. There is no other information about the survey participants, such as gender, age, education or residence.

The survey results and numbers just don’t jibe with the headlines and the article. The survey number is too small to be relevant and the questions obviously had a political bias.

New York State has nearly 11.5 million registered voters; I don’t think 863 is a fair sample of public opinion. Since the Siena survey found that 51 percent of upstate voters think corruption is a serious problem in state government, it seems disingenuous to conclude that there is “little interest” based on one particular issue.

Maybe a key factor for the supposed lack of interest in the Moreland issue has something to do with inadequate media coverage of the accomplishments of the Moreland Commission.

Barbara A. Rogers

Hamburg