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Common Core is helping our children better compete

The March 29 News editorial, “Preserve the Core,” has it right.

For decades educators have worked to increase the rigor and relevance of school curricula and to engage students in challenging learning, including problem solving and creativity. Common Core enhances the probability that all children are receiving the educational opportunities they deserve and need to succeed in our world.

We often hear that Common Core is “controversial,” when really the controversy is about changes in state testing and the fact that test results are part of APPR, the teacher evaluation process. These changes have been difficult, and not always handled well.

But that does not mean the Common Core is bad or wrong for our students and teachers.

In districts where teachers and administrators are working to implement the Common Core together across all grades in an organized and positive manner, the changes in classrooms are truly remarkable. How many of our legislators have been in these classrooms? They have no way to see and understand firsthand what is happening.

I am a retired educator – teacher, reading specialist, curriculum/instruction director and superintendent – who worked in Western New York for 35 years. I fully understand how we as educators, parents and community members can best help our students grow, learn and develop into well-balanced, capable people who are prepared to succeed as they graduate high school and enter the “real” world.

I am also a mother and grandmother. Currently my six grandchildren, who live in three states other than New York, are benefiting from implementation of the Common Core. Children in New York state are benefiting, too.

Common Core instruction increases rigor and skill building, which leads to more in-depth student learning. We must not lose momentum. Common Core implementation is improving our schools because it is helping our students learn what is needed for their tomorrows.

Delia G. Bonenberger

Springville