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Policy on beer sales is taken to extremes

On Aug. 17, my wife and I were doing our weekly grocery shopping in Lakewood. Included in our weekly grocery items of milk, eggs and juice was a 12-pack of beer. While checking out, the cashier asked for ID, which I happily supplied, but the cashier did not want my ID. Instead she wanted to see my son’s ID.

I informed the cashier my son was 20, at which point she informed me that I would not be able to purchase beer because all parties in my family were not over 21. The cashier, and her manager, informed me about the store’s policy of not selling adult beverages to any party that includes someone under the age of 21.

While I applaud the store’s effort to crack down on underage drinking, I do have to question the judgment of the cashier and her manager for not seeing we were actually grocery shopping as a family and not there just for the beer. Of course, this also has me wondering if this same policy would apply if my son were 20 months old instead of 20 years old.

I do respect the store’s right to serve or not serve anyone, and I hope it respects my right to no longer spend my hard-earned dollars in its store. It is bad enough that local, state and federal governments have decided to tell people what is good or bad for them, but when private business starts to act like a nanny as well, then I guess it’s time for me to take my business and my money elsewhere.

Rob Reid

Jamestown