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Motorcyclists need to expect the worst

I have been riding a motorcycle a long time and what I was taught at the start still applies. It basically comes down to two rules. The first is that you must fully believe that everyone else on the road, including other motorcycles, is out to kill you. You do not approach an intersection and assume that because you have the right of way and the light is green that someone will not turn right on red in front of you or look you in the eye and turn left in front of you.

The second rule, and I admit it sounds kind of Buddhist, is that you are not the master of your machine. When you make that assumption, it will teach you a new trick. What that comes down to is that when you think you are so good at riding that you can do anything, you are heading for trouble. This manifests itself in people taking turns too fast or going into turns or off ramps that tighten up, and if you are not ready to drop a gear or grab some brake, you are in a bind.

Had these two rules been followed, most of those who died this past summer would still be with us. Having your headlight on or blinking and having loud pipes will not save your life. The only device you have that will keep you alive is in your helmet and between your ears. You are invisible. This also applies to people who ride bicycles.

Patrick Kelly

Grand Island