ADVERTISEMENT

Media have a duty to report the facts

To understand how a dictator is able to create a lie system that would be believable, all one has to do is analyze the methods used by the local media when incorporated into a well-orchestrated lie system, based on “if you tell a lie long enough and loud enough, people will soon begin believing the lie.”

On Aug. 19, a negative front-page News story about School Superintendent Pamela Brown is a classic example of how repeated lies are regularly carried by print and television media outlets. For months, readers and viewers have heard and read a current board member’s unsubstantiated negative allegations against Brown. Instead of analyzing those outlandish comments, WGRZ-TV and The News chose to present those diatribes as fact without challenging their validity.

On or about June 27, I received one of those Carl Paladino tirade letters filled with errors in judgment and untruths about the superintendent. I made note of at least 10 false statements, highlighted my personal comments on those misstatements and hand-carried the comments to both WGRZ-TV and The News. There was never a response from either agency.

Thus, it becomes very easy to understand how those lies about Brown have been told long enough and often enough that they have become believable by those not knowing the facts. Apparently, neither The News nor WGRZ-TV is interested in uncovering facts. In Buffalo, freedom of the press takes a back seat to facts.

Frank B. Mesiah

President, Buffalo Branch

National Association for the

Advancement of Colored People