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Coach’s treatment is certainly not ‘abusive’

I am a board-certified emergency medicine physician. I am trained to look for signs of physical and emotional abuse. I am legally responsible for reporting my suspicions to police or child/adult protective services. I am trained to treat injuries of abuse, both physical and psychological. I find it extraordinarily irresponsible to characterize Coach Deborah Matos’ treatment of athletes at City Honors School as “abusive.”

Long practices? Daughters in tears because Coach yelled at them? I am embarrassed for the parents named in the article, Jim Gribbins and Meg Gifford. Surely if they find Coach’s treatment of players as abusive, their daughters will have a tough, long road ahead of them.

In my four years of medical school at the University at Buffalo and my three years of residency training at UC Davis in California, there certainly have been times where I’ve wanted to cry (and have cried) and spent longer than 2½ hours at a class, lab or in a surgical case or on-call in the hospital. And I am better for it, thanks to three years of being the starting catcher on the City Honors girls softball team under Matos.

Cassie (Durawa) Quint, M.D.

Carmichael, Calif.