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There. That’s it. That’s the end of the snowfall for this winter – and possibly the next two, as well. We’ve had our quota and then some. No mas.

Seriously, who’s in charge of this? Barely a week from spring and we have to put up with a blizzard – the second in two months? Isn’t it time for robins and crocuses and tulips? So many questions and no good answers.

But, lacking any control whatsoever over how much snow falls and when it chooses to do so, we’ll suggest the normal human response to utter helplessness: Look on the bright side.

Highway departments seemed to be well-prepared for the season’s umpteenth snowfall. In fact, they generally responded superbly, as did the Western New Yorkers who heeded pleas to stay off the roads if possible.

Streets and highways were largely passable by Thursday morning, and the region quickly returned to normal. Assuming, of course, that anyone is willing to accept 13.5 inches of snow in mid-March as something within the bounds of normal.

Staying positive, even the weather forecasters did well, giving Western New Yorkers ample and accurate warning about the “snow event,” as some of the TV people like to call these storms. That helps immeasurably, as anyone who remembers the pre-Thanksgiving surprise storm of 2000 can quickly attest.

The kids, of course, had a day off from school, which no doubt gladdened many of their precious hearts, at least for the moment.

Wait until they find out they may have to lose other time off because the snow days have been piled higher than the snow banks.

But enough. Winter has to end at some point and, while the official terminus arrives in a mere six days, let’s just get it over with and declare that winter ended the moment that the last flake of 2014 Blizzard No. 2 drifted to earth.

It’s not implausible. Although the calendar reports that the vernal equinox arrives on March 20, the daylight hours will actually exceed the nighttime hours in these parts three days earlier.

On March 17 – a date already well known for its cheer – the day will lengthen by 2 minutes and 55 seconds over the previous day, pushing the total to a grin-inducing 12 hours, zero minutes and 10 seconds. We’re there.

Cue the chlorophyll. Ready the forsythia. It’s time for a change. Now wouldn’t be too soon.