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Well, it’s a start. On Monday, Nik Wallenda’s daredevil high-wire walk across Niagara Falls two years ago was memorialized with the unveiling of a stone marker. The modest monument includes a piece of the wire he used to cross the cataract as thousands watched from the riverbanks and millions more on television.

It took only 26 minutes, but it captured the imaginations of all who watched, and gave the City of Niagara Falls a new claim to fame. It took more than two years to put the monument in place – not bad for Western New York – but still waiting are plans for a permanent tourist attraction in the Falls related to the walk. Instead, this year, Wallenda is performing for 10 weeks at the Darien Lake amusement park and will make an appearance at the Erie County Fair.

It’s good to see the monument in place, but we hope the city is still working toward a venue where Wallenda can perform.

It’s not quite Downton on the Potomac, but the comparative living conditions of Western New York’s House members do bring to mind the British television show of an aristocratic family and its unglamorous servants.

While Rep. Chris Collins, R-Clarence, lives in comparative style in a $775,000 condo he bought, Brian Higgins, D-Buffalo, and Tom Reed, R-Corning, make do with sleeping on sofas in their congressional offices.

Collins, a millionaire businessman, has the money to live comfortably in notoriously expensive Washington. Reed and especially Higgins, with two children in college, do not.

Even then, Collins’ digs, in Western New York terms, are not ostentatious, but they allow him to have his family with him. Maybe he can rent out his office sofa when Higgins and Reed have company.

It’s not every day a newspaper turns 125, but that’s what happened this week when the Wall Street Journal celebrated a century and a quarter of publishing.

On Tuesday, the Journal’s front page was a facsimile of its first publication under that name, on July 8, 1889. At that point, this paper was already 9 years old as a daily paper, then known as The Buffalo Evening News. So, happy birthday, little brother. You sure got big.