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Psychic medium Karyn Reece has seen dead people since she was a child. At age 7, she foresaw the death of her father. Reece calls these abilities her “gift” and today they have become her livelihood.

Reece who operates the Mystic Shop in Snyder has conducted at least 10,000 readings and consulations. Her clients range in age from 35 to 55 and include politicians, entertainers and law enforcement officials. About 75 percent are women, she said. Reece has appeared on a variety of cable television channels including A&E, Biography, Lifetime, TLC and Discovery.

She is married with two kittens.

People Talk: How do these visions come to you?

Karyn Reece: Do you know when you daydream? I get daydreamy visions, like little television screens that show me the past, the present and the future. And then I have dead people coming in. It’s crazy. It’s chaotic.

PT: You can turn it off, right?

KR: You can but you get bleed-throughs. Sometimes I may go about my business – maybe shopping at the mall – and suddenly something flashes. And later that day I’ll make a connection. I don’t think of it as work.

PT: You must have had a curious childhood.

KR: Ever since I can remember I would see dead people. I would know things ahead. My mom would say: “I saw three dead monks” or “I heard Uncle Frank,” who was dead. So I assumed it was normal that people would know things ahead of time. Both of her parents were psychics and Catholics.

PT: Is being gifted in your genes?

KR: It’s genetic. Everyone has abilities, just like everybody can draw a stick figure but not everybody is a DaVinci. All mediums are psychics, but not all psychics are mediums. Mediums will talk to dead people, see dead people and communicate with the other side. Psychics will tell you the past, the present and the future.

PT: Does it take a while for your friends to get used to you?

KR: No. I mean I was gifted since I was a kid, but I’ve lived a very normal life. People always assume that since you’re a psychic you’re some kind of airy fairy. My mom’s side are the psychics. My dad’s side are all Mensa members, really brilliant people. My dad was an engineer. My brother is a retired jet fighter. He’s gifted too.

PT: Do psychics have a support group?

KR: No, but a lot of psychics look up to me. The problem with the industry is that it’s unregulated. Anybody can call themselves a psychic. A really gifted psychic doesn’t need tools like cards, crystal balls. I don’t use tools – not to mention I’m too lazy to learn cards and what they mean. I just sit down and start slamming out my information.

PT: How are you on the radio?

KR: I love doing radio. You never know what you’ll get on the radio. As a psychic you’re picking up fine energy, like radio waves. I don’t need someone sitting in front of me. As soon as I get on the phone with them it’s like an instant connection. It’s nice because I can sit home in my pajamas on my phone days.

PT: Did you work your way through college?

KR: Yes. I didn’t want to waitress, so I decided to be a stockbroker. I ended up switching my degree to business. I learned early on about cold call, marketing, sales. I didn’t have passion for it but I learned a lot.

PT: How did you meet your husband?

KR: He’s a retired stockbroker. We met at Jimmy Mac’s. It was really funny. Three days before I met him I saw his face. I was on the Scajaquada on my way to a BPO concert. I remember seeing his face and thinking, “He’s so not my type. I’m not into beards.”

PT: How old were you when you foresaw the death of your father?

KR: Age 7. I kept getting this vision of my father passing. I kept seeing him in a blue casket, but I didn’t say anything. My brother had the same vision, but we didn’t discuss it. For three weeks straight, I’d get up, walk to school, I’d see the vision constantly. Two days before Thanksgiving, my father died of a stroke he had overnight. My mom buried him in a blue casket to match his blue eyes. A week after, when my brother and I were playing, we realized each of us had seen the same thing.

PT: Did your gift help you on tests in school?

KR: No, because that’s left brain, and when you do this type of work you’re using your right mind, where your creativity is. That’s why a lot of psychics are creative. Your left brain is always analytical.

PT: What makes a good psychic?

KR: I’m specific. A lot of psychics will say: “Who’s John?” I’ll tell you who this person is, what they want, if they’re dead. It’s all in the detail. I give names, numbers dates and times. A lot is interpretation. It’s not as easy as people think it is.

PT: Who is your role model?

KR: James VanPraagh. He used to produce the “Ghost Whisperer.” He’s very ethical and he’s great at what he does. Good heart. Good intentions. This type of field provides closure after the loss of a loved one who has crossed over – including pets. It’s helping people facilitate healing.

PT: What do people most want to know?

KR: I get people who are anxiety-ridden over their job. They want a compass of how to go forward in their life, what to expect with job, money, love. Probably the deepest ones that affect me are parents who have lost children or pets.

PT: What’s an aura?

KR: A magnetic field around your body. We all have it. Within your magnetic field, you have your past, your present, your future thoughts, your physical conditions – all sorts of information. And they change depending on where you are mentally and physically. I’ll be driving and I’ll feel all this energy from the top of my head, and a light will pop. My magnetic field will off set a streetlight and cause it to go out. ATM machines, too. I’ve popped brand new hair dryers, vacuum cleaners.

PT: Do you get many headaches?

KR: I get headaches all the time, in part because of the energy. It’s extremely tiring. In social settings I get a lot of information. And some people drive me crazy asking me questions.

PT: Tell me a funny story from your childhood.

KR: One Halloween, my mother dressed me up as Casper the Friendly Ghost. That’s just wrong. In a family that sees ghosts, really?

email: jkwiatkowski@buffnews.com