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Many people think that holiday splurging on weight-lifting food and drink is still about a month away.

Tell that to the kids headed out to trick or treat next week – and to some of their parents who will share the generally fattening bounty.

On a typical Halloween, an average child consumes the equivalent of 4,800 calories, 1½ cups of fat and 3 cups of sugar. Incorporating some simple strategies now can keep your family out of this shocking statistic, according to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.

1. Freezers and deadlines: Parents can give kids a deadline for enjoying candy and then toss out what’s left over or freeze it for later.

2. Eat early: Eat dinner as a family before heading out for trick or treat.

3. Keep the car at home: Walk the route. It is a terrific bonding activity for families and you’d be surprised how many calories you can burn on a crisp, autumn night.

4. Emphasize portion sizes: The USDA recommends 1 cup of fruit or vegetables as a serving size; ¾ or ½ cup for starches or grains; 2 to 6 ounces of protein; and n of a cup, which is also 2 tablespoons, of a condiment, dip, jam or salad dressing. Sticking to these sizes assures you won’t overeat and can avoid the temptation to load up on the candy or the turkey, trimmings, gravy and mashed potatoes. It may even help you with weight loss.

5. Good taste is year round: Make everyday meals balanced yet yummy. To feel full and satisfied longer, and to avoid overeating, make sure each holiday season meal is nutritional and balanced with a fruit or vegetable, protein and starch. Too much of just one category will leave you hungry.

6. Pour it right: When it comes to holiday cocktails for parents, a recent Iowa State Study shows wine glass size, placement and wine color can influence and promote overpouring. Pick glasses that induce a 4- to 6-ounce pour.

Tips provided by LivligaHome.com, maker of “right-sized” dishware for families.