ADVERTISEMENT

SOMETHING TO READ

“Rose” by Holly Webb; Sourcebooks Jabberwocky, $6.99.

Holly Webb is a best-selling author in the United Kingdom with books “Lost in the Snow” and “Lost in the Storm” and she has written a marvelous mystery, the first of a series, that may appeal to fans of Lemony Snicket and Harry Potter.

All 10-year-old Rose knows of her past is that she was left as a baby in a fish basket at St. Bridget’s Home for Abandoned Girls in London. The orphanage is a dreary place; the high point of the week for the orphan girls is visiting the “relics” in Miss Lockwood’s parlor, trinkets that had been left with them when they were abandoned. Rose sometimes sees visions, she is able to communicate with cats and knows she is somehow different from the other girls. All she hopes for is to someday be able to “go out to service,” that is, work as a maid in a rich person’s house and make money. Her dream comes true when she is taken on as a housemaid at the grand mansion of famous alchemist Mr. Fountain, who supposedly has figured out a way to make gold. Rose has to work hard but she is fed well and has her own tiny room. But then children, including some of Rose’s friends from the orphanage, start disappearing. Can Rose figure out a way to save them? This book is suspenseful and funny and full of colorful characters.

– Jean Westmoore

SOMETHING TO DO

The Lewiston Council on the Arts is presenting its Marble Orchard Ghost Walks on Saturdays in September and October. Visitors should gather promptly at 7 p.m. at the Lewiston Peace Garden, 476 Center St., Lewiston. Admission is $15 for adults, $12 for LCA members and $8 for children under 12. The walks will be held rain or shine; bring a flashlight. For information, call 754-0166 or visit www.artcouncil.org.

SOMETHING TO LEARN

Stars are born. They live out their lives, and then they explode and die. As a star begins to explode, its core quickly collapses. As the core collapses, the star releases a whole lot of energy. Such a massive amount of energy causes the star to erupt into a supernova. A supernova will shine a billion times brighter than our sun before it fades from view.

– Time for Kids: Big Book of Why