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On a Kindle, a Nook, your computer, from your library or from a bookstore, it doesn’t matter how you read them; books are books, and no matter what form they are in, the words remain the same. Looking back at 2013, we see the popularity of long-since published books revived alongside the new releases of long-awaited sequels.

1. “Allegiant” by Veronica Roth: In the long-awaited sequel to the widely popular “Divergent” and “Insurgent,” Tris Prior is introduced to a new reality in the wake of the shattered faction-based society she once knew and believed in. Told in the dual perspectives of both Tris and Tobias, “Allegiant” promises a riveting tale that will toy with your emotions until the very end.

2. “Clockwork Princess” by Cassandra Clare: The third and final installment of “The Infernal Devices” series plunges the reader back into the world of Shadowhunters and returns them to the London Institute headed by Charlotte Branwell, where the villainous Mortmain plots to set his plan in motion. Alongside the angsty, yet refreshingly well-written love triangle between Tessa, Jem and Will, “Clockwork Princess” is a page turner that leaves you unwilling to say farewell to the London Institute even in the very end.

3. “Requiem (Delirium No. 3)” by Lauren Oliver: An active member of the resistance, Lena is not at the center of the revolution in “Requiem.” Met with mixed reviews, most concerning the lack of character development Lena received, another angsty love-triangle and incomplete plot, “Requiem” was not at all what readers were expecting.

4. “Unravel Me (Shatter Me No. 2)” by Tahereh Mafi: In the sequel to the well-received “Shatter Me,” Juliette is forced to choose between what is right and what her heart tells her to do. Although still burdened by her lethal touch, she is finally free from The Re-establishment, and their wicked plan. “Unravel Me” promises a thrilling yet heartbreaking story that will make the reader look forward to the sequel.

5. “Prodigy (Legend No. 2)” by Marie Lu: The long-awaited sequel to “Legend,” June is the Republic’s most wanted traitor and Day is believed to be dead. Desperate, they turn to the rebel group dedicated to bringing down the Republic called the Patriots. A well-written plot coupled with superb character development, “Prodigy” delivers all it promised and more.

6. “The House of Hades (The Heroes of Olympus No. 4)” by Rick Riordan: Mark of Athena left the readers with Annabeth and Percy plunging into the depths of Tartarus, and their other five friends are forced to push aside their emotions and find the mortal side of the Doors and Death. Riordan continues to lead readers through a world where Greek myths are all too real and brings them on an incredible page-turning adventure riddled with plot twists that will leave them yearning for the sequel.

7. “Scarlet (Lunar Chronicles No. 2)” by Marissa Meyer: In this futuristic version of our most well-known fairy tales, Cinder is introduced to Scarlet and Wolf and together they try to stay one step ahead of Lunar Queen Levana, who will stop at nothing to persuade Prince Kai to take her hand in marriage. Meyer again amazes readers with her ability to take such well-known fairy tales and mesh them into her sci-fi setting. With mind-blowingly well-written characters, romance (if not a bit too hasty) and an incredible plot, “Scarlet” is a page-turning, futuristic adventure, fairy-tale style.

8. “The Book Thief” by Markus Zusak: In light of the movie adaptation, “The Book Thief” seems to have once again grown in popularity. Liesel Meminger is a foster girl living in Nazi Germany who only lives by stealing what she can when she discovers irresistible books. She learns to read and creates an “underground library” with her neighbors. Author Markus Zusak brings to life the intensity of Liesel’s story through his well-crafted writing, giving us one of the most enduring stories of our time.

9. “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green: Ever since its release in 2012, “The Fault in Our Stars” has been reaching out to readers of all ages. Green carefully crafts the heart-wrenchingly beautiful story between Hazel, a girl with terminal cancer, and Augustus Waters, a seemingly anonymous boy who will soon change her life. Eye-opening and well-crafted, “The Fault in Our Stars” is a must-read for all ages.

Maia Gallagher is a sophomore at Buffalo Seminary.