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Chobani yogurt set for school lunch trial

Chobani yogurt will be the yogurt of choice in a USDA pilot program to serve Greek yogurt in school lunches.

New York State was chosen for the pilot program earlier this month because of its burgeoning Greek yogurt manufacturing sector and the high level of interest in the program among state school districts.

Chobani will be served as part of the new pilot program set to start next month, U.S. Sens. Charles E. Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand recently announced.

New York leads the country in Greek yogurt production. The pilot program will test the cost effectiveness of the food in the school lunch program, which feeds 31 million students monthly nationwide. Compared with regular yogurt, Greek yogurt has twice the protein, less sodium and fewer carbohydrates.

If the pilot program is successful in the trial states, Greek yogurt could become a permanent fixture on the USDA Foods List for school meals. In addition to New York, Tennessee, Idaho and Arizona also will participate in the pilot program.

‘Moving Day’ targets Parkinson’s disease

“Moving Day,” a three-mile walk to raise money and awareness about Parkinson’s disease and its treatment, will take place Sept. 7 at Coca-Cola Field; registration will start at 8 a.m., and the walk will start at 8:45.

Along with the walk and information about Parkinson’s, there will be a “Movement Pavilion” where visitors can see demonstrations of low-impact exercises including tai chi, yoga, stretching and dance. Water, fresh fruit and other refreshments will be provided. The band Samshing Glass will perform.

There is no registration fee and participants who raise at least $100 will receive a Moving Day T-shirt.

For more information, visit parkinson.org and click under “Buffalo NY Moving Day” under featured events.

Dr. Walter joins Invision Health

Dr. Lonny Walter, a family medicine physician, will join Invision Health on Monday. His office will be at 400 International Drive in Amherst.

Walter has a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University at Buffalo and is a graduate of UB Medical School. He did his family medicine residency at Deaconess Hospital of Buffalo. He has practiced family medicine in Western New York for three decades. To schedule an appointment, call 631-3555, Ext. 318.

Minorities sought for clinical research

In an effort to increase the number of minority investigators in clinical research, Eli Lilly and Co. and the Center for Drug Development and Clinical Trials at Roswell Park Cancer Institute recently announced a collaborative training program.

The partnership will include a three-day clinical research workshop, “Reducing Cancer Disparities Through the Training of a Diverse Workforce,” for minority physicians across the country. Workshops will begin in spring 2014 and will run through 2016.

There are approximately 10,400 oncologists in the United States, but only about 2 percent are African-American and about 3 percent are Hispanic. The goal of the new initiative is to train 75 to 150 oncologists in the conduct of clinical trials. Enrollment for the 2014 workshop will begin this fall, with details about the application process to be posted on both the RPCI and Lilly websites.

Book list services for mental health

The Mental Health Association in Niagara County is distributing the 28th edition of the Help Book, a phone directory of community services created for county residents.

Listings in the Help Book are organized by category, including emergency phone numbers, children/youth, counseling, employment, family, food, legal issues, senior citizens and veterans.

An online version of the directory is free and is accessible through mhanc.com. The Help Book also is available for 25 cents, to help defray the cost of printing the pocket-sized directory, by calling 433-3780. It also can be accessed through the Help Line, 433-5432, a phone referral system which is staffed at all times.

– News staff and wire services