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Worthington charged in assault

Police say actor Sam Worthington has been arrested in New York City for allegedly punching a photographer after the man kicked Worthington’s girlfriend in the shin.

The 37-year-old “Avatar” actor was arrested on an assault charge following the incident at about 5:30 p.m. Sunday on Jane Street and Greenwich Avenue in Greenwich Village.

The Australian actor was released on a desk appearance ticket and is due back in court Wednesday. Police did not say what caused the scuffle.

The photographer, 37-year-old Sheng Li, was arrested on charges of reckless endangerment, assault and harassment.

Roker, de Blasio bury hatchet

Mayor Bill de Blasio and NBC weatherman Al Roker on Monday found closure over school closures and a spat that played out publicly over Twitter earlier this month.

De Blasio appeared on the “Today” show to cut the ribbon on NBC’s new plaza in midtown Manhattan. A friendly Roker introduced the mayor.

“We’ll get this out of the way. We had a little, little chat about school closings and snow, and we want the best for the schoolkids and our city,” Roker said.

“That’s right,” de Blasio said. “And now look, I think together, letting people know what’s going on with the weather, letting people know how they can be safe, that’s something we do together.”

De Blasio pointed out that snow is coming back to New York in the next few days and presented Roker a Department of Sanitation hat emblazoned “DSNY.”

Baldwin laments loss of privacy

Alec Baldwin says he misses the days when New Yorkers signaled their appreciation of celebrities briefly and politely while taking care to maintain privacy.

The 55-year-old actor writes in New York magazine that he “probably” needs to move out of the nation’s largest city.

Baldwin says he has a happy home for the first time in his adult life. He says he’s considering Los Angeles, living insulated behind a gate with his wife and their child.

A lot of the article deals with comments that Baldwin says were misquoted or misinterpreted.

Among other things, he details strongly worded evidence that he’s not homophobic.

Elvis wire to parents on display

The telegram sent by Elvis Presley to his parents in November 1954 gives a glimpse into the young singer’s priorities and his optimism, as he begins what will become a career as a rock ’n’ roll icon and cultural phenomenon.

“Hi babies,” says the telegram, sent from Houston by Presley to his parents, Vernon and Gladys, who were in Memphis, Tenn. “Here’s the money to pay the bills. Don’t tell no one how much I sent. Will send more next week. There is a card in the mail. Love, Elvis.”

The note is being displayed in an exhibit at Graceland, Presley’s longtime Memphis home that today serves as a museum and tourist attraction.

The exhibit, which opened Monday, commemorates the 60 years since Presley cut his first record, “That’s All Right,” at Sun Studio in July 1954.