De Niro remembers dad

Creativity runs in the De Niro family.

Robert De Niro’s father, Robert De Niro Sr., was an abstract expressionist painter, part of the post-WWII art scene, which produced such talent as Jackson Pollock. He was even endorsed by the famed art collector and socialite, Peggy Guggenheim. But while he was successful in the 1940s and ’50s, De Niro Sr.’s work went out of style in the ’60s.

He died in 1993 at 71, but his story is now being told by his Oscar-winning son. De Niro has made a documentary about his father called “Remembering the Artist Robert De Niro Sr.,” which premiered at Sundance Film Festival and will air on HBO in June. He also put some of his father’s work on display at the Julie Nestor Gallery in Park City.

Hall eyes ‘Dexter’ redux

Possible bad news for Oregon loggers: Michael C. Hall won’t rule out a return to playing Dexter. But he’d want to see the finish line.

Hall, promoting his movie “Cold in July” at the Sundance Film Festival, said in an interview over the weekend that he agreed with Showtime executives who recently declared that any potential spin-off series would have to include Hall.

“ ‘Masuka!’ I would watch that,” he joked, referring to the show’s humorous forensics specialist Vince Masuka, played by C.S. Lee.

Burns examines country music

PBS documentary maker Ken Burns is examining the roots of country music and how it has changed through the present day for a multi-episode series on public broadcasting.

Country fans have a wait ahead of them, though. PBS said Monday that Burns’ country music project isn’t set to air until 2018.

The noted documentarian has several other projects in the works for PBS, including one on the Gettysburg Address that will air this spring, and films on the Roosevelts, Jackie Robinson and Vietnam.

The country series explores the question, “what is country music.” It will track the careers of the Carter family, Jimmie Rodgers, Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson and others.

Cuaron gives TV a try

Oscar-nominated director Alfonso Cuaron is trying television for the first time, teaming with producer J.J. Abrams on a new series.

The two have known each other for about 20 years, and Abrams was eager to work with Cuaron. Cuaron is up for a best director Oscar for “Gravity,” the category he won at the Golden Globes.

Cuaron concocted the idea for the new series, “Believe,” debuting March 10 on NBC, while shooting “Gravity” with Sandra Bullock and George Clooney. He contacted Abrams, who came aboard as co-executive producer for the series starring Delroy Lindo, Kyle MacLachlan and Jamie Chung.

Cuaron joked Sunday to the Television Critics Association that after working in space, he wanted to do something where people weren’t floating. The series revolves around a 10-year-old girl with supernatural powers who’s pursued by sinister forces.