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A travel advisory for McKellen

Actor Ian McKellen says the British government has advised him not to go to Russia because of the country’s anti-gay “propaganda” law.

McKellen, known to millions as Gandalf in the “Lord of the Rings” and “Hobbit” films, told Radio Times magazine that the Foreign Office had informed him “they couldn’t protect me from those laws.”

The openly gay 74-year-old actor expressed disbelief that this was the case “in the land of Tchaikovsky, Diaghilev, Rudolf Nureyev — gay artists whose sexuality informed their work.”

Russia has banned “propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations” aimed at anyone under 18.

Barrymore has no complaints

Drew Barrymore isn’t exactly feeling the pregnancy glow.

“I feel so lucky to make healthy kids that I will never complain about anything because I just know how lucky I am,” the 38-year-old actress said at a recent event for her beauty brand, Flower. “But I definitely don’t feel superhot. I feel more like an Oompa Loompa.”

Barrymore and her husband, Will Kopelman, are expecting their second child. Their daughter, Olive, is 14 months old.

Her top pregnancy style tips include “a really tight bra and a really loose blouse,” great lipstick and a supportive partner.

Barrymore has taken a break from the big screen to focus on motherhood and various business ventures, which include Barrymore Wines; her production company, Flower Films; a new photography book, “Find It in Everything”; and her beauty brand for Walmart Stores Inc.

Andrews missed film remake

More than 18 million television viewers watched Carrie Underwood perform the role of Maria last week in NBC’s “The Sound of Music Live!”

Julie Andrews wasn’t among them.

Andrews, who starred in the 1965 Oscar-winning film adaptation of the Rodgers & Hammerstein classic, explained, “Alas, I did not (see it). I had a speaking engagement and I couldn’t. But my kids did record it. I’ll get around to it.”

She attended the U.S. premiere Monday night of “Saving Mr. Banks,” which depicts the battle between P.L. Travers, author of the “Mary Poppins” novels, and Walt Disney, who worked for decades to persuade the writer that the “Poppins” tales would make a fine film.

“Saving Mr. Banks” picks up the story in 1961, when the London-based Travers finally agreed to a two-week visit to Los Angeles to meet with Disney and his creative team.

In “Banks,” Travers (played by Emma Thompson) goes on a tirade about the hiring of Dick Van Dyke.

On the arrivals line, Van Dyke revealed an additional Travers tidbit.

“Well, she wasn’t thrilled with Julie, either,” he said. “She wanted a dumpy little Mary Poppins. She didn’t want a pretty girl. So, she didn’t like either one of us.”

The Disney-Travers battle was concluded before Andrews was deep into production. “I had heard rumors, no doubt about it,” the actress said, adding that she and Travers became friendly and later wrote letters to each other.

“Saving Mr. Banks” opens in limited release in the U.S. this weekend.