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Rather gets a snub from CBS

CBS News hasn’t invited Dan Rather back to participate in its 50th-anniversary coverage of the Kennedy assassination, but images of the longtime anchor who parted bitterly with the network will be a part of its upcoming documentary on how the story unfolded that day.

Rather helped organize CBS’ plans for President John F. Kennedy’s visit to Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, and as a young reporter was a key component of assassination coverage. Now 82, with his own show on AXS-TV, he’s one of the few reporters on the story that day still active in journalism.

Rather, who later became CBS News’ top anchor for 24 years, will appear on NBC’s “Today” show on Nov. 22 this year.

Cable channel to reboot ‘Roots’

Slavery is a hot topic, with the success of “12 Years A Slave” and “Django Unchained.”

Now History is seeking to capitalize by remaking the historic 1977 miniseries “Roots.” The cable channel announced that it will reboot the groundbreaking miniseries as an eight-hour project, according to Deadline. Mark Wolper, son of late “Roots” executive producer David L. Wolper, will head up the project as executive producer.

The new version will draw on the original novel by Alex Haley and the miniseries for a “contemporary perspective,” the report said.

Pitbull tapped to host AMAs

Pitbull will host the American Music Awards. The Miami rapper will perform his song “Timber” with Ke$ha during the Nov. 24 awards show, to air live from Los Angeles on ABC, it was announced Tuesday.

The 32-year-old, whose real name is Armando Christian Perez, was chosen in part for his Latino heritage as the AMAs celebrate the 25th anniversary of Gloria Estefan’s appearance on the show and the 15th year of the favorite artist Latin category. Estefan was the first Latin AMA performer.

Pitbull will be joined in performance by lead nominees Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Miley Cyrus, Lady Gaga, Kendrick Lamar, One Direction, Luke Bryan and Florida Georgia Line

Ms. Marvel to be Muslim

Marvel Comics is bringing Ms. Marvel back as a 16-year-old daughter of Pakistani immigrants living in Jersey City named Kamala Khan.

The character – among the first to be a series protagonist who is both a woman and Muslim – is part of Marvel Entertainment’s efforts to reflect a growing diversity among its readers while keeping ahold of the contemporary relevance that have underlined its foundation since the creation of Spider-Man and the X-Men in the early 1960s.

Writer G. Willow Wilson and artist Adrian Alphona, working with editor Sana Amanat, say the series reflects Khan’s vibrant but kinetic world, learning to deal with superpowers, family expectations and adolescence.

Amanat calls the series a “desire to explore the Muslim-American diaspora from an authentic perspective” and what it means to be young and lost amid expectations by others while also telling the story of a teenager coming to grips with having amazing powers.