ADVERTISEMENT

Muppets head to Smithsonian

Miss Piggy is finally joining her love, Kermit the Frog, in the Smithsonian Institution’s collection of Jim Henson’s Muppets, and Bert and Ernie will have a place in history, too.

Henson’s daughter, Cheryl Henson, donated more than 20 puppets and props Tuesday to the National Museum of American History. The donation included Miss Piggy and some of her co-stars from “The Muppet Show” including Fozzie Bear, Scooter and the Swedish Chef. Henson also donated a number of puppets from “Sesame Street” including Bert and Ernie, Elmo, Cookie Monster, Grover, and Count Von Count.

The donation also included Boober Fraggle and Travelling Matt from “Fraggle Rock.” Many of the puppets are the first constructions of the characters.

The museum was previously home to Oscar the Grouch, Kermit and the cast of Henson’s early TV show “Sam and Friends.” The collection includes the original Kermit the Frog creation and the more famous Kermit from “Sesame Street” and “The Muppet Show.”

Lohan’s mom pleads not guilty

Her licensed suspended, Dina Lohan left a suburban New York courthouse in a chauffeur-driven Rolls Royce on Tuesday after entering a not guilty plea on speeding and drunken driving charges.

Lohan, 50, was surrounded by a media throng usually associated with her troubled actress daughter, Lindsay, as she left a Long Island courthouse following her arraignment. She was released without bail until her next court appearance Oct. 23.

The only apparent family member accompanying Lohan to court was her mother, Ann Sullivan.

Judge Joy Watson released Lohan without bail but ordered her driver’s license suspended, citing the severity of the alleged drunken driving charge.

State police arrested Lohan on Sept. 12 after stopping her for allegedly driving 77 mph in a 55 mph zone on a Long Island parkway. Police said her blood-alcohol level was 0.20, more than double the legal limit of 0.08.

TV hosts to write News column

Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb are joining the Daily News as columnists.

The newspaper says the pair, the hosts of the fourth hour of NBC’s “Today” show, will dispense advice on food and fashion and discuss pop culture.

Their column begins Thursday.

First lady praises Harlem

Extolling the virtues of Harlem’s rich cultural history, Michelle Obama hosted a luncheon for the spouses of foreign dignitaries Tuesday in the historic New York City neighborhood she described as “quintessentially American.”

The first lady spoke to about 50 spouses of chiefs of state and heads of government who are attending the UN General Assembly. The group toured The Studio Museum in Harlem, which was founded in 1968 by artists and civic and community leaders to provide space for modern and contemporary black art.

Obama discussed Harlem’s place in the early 20th century as the heart of black culture in the U.S., pointing to famous writers and musicians like Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston and Louis Armstrong.