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Whose son is this?

Mia Farrow says in an interview with Vanity Fair that it’s possible her son with Woody Allen is instead Frank Sinatra’s.

Farrow told the magazine that she and Sinatra “never really split up,” and when asked if Ronan Farrow might actually be Sinatra’s son, she answered, “Possibly.”

Ronan Farrow tweeted Wednesday: “Listen, we’re all (asterisk)possibly (asterisk) Frank Sinatra’s son.”

A representative for Allen told the Associated Press, “The article is so fictitious and extravagantly absurd that he is not going to comment.”

Mia Farrow was married to Sinatra for 18 months.

Play coming to New York

Irish playwright Conor McPherson’s latest play, “The Night Alive,” will leap from the Donmar Warehouse in London to the Atlantic Theater Company in New York next month with the same cast led by Jim Norton.

The play explores the disruptive impact of a female intruder on a world of masculine solitude. A nine-week run begins Nov. 30 with an opening set for Dec. 12.

Strike shuts Carnegie Hall

Carnegie Hall canceled its season-opening concert Wednesday night featuring the Philadelphia Orchestra and superstar violinist Joshua Bell.

The announcement followed the calling of a strike by the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees Local One, the union representing stagehands at the famed venue. As Bloomberg reported in July, a senior Carnegie Hall stagehand’s annual pay in 2011 was $465,000.

“The season-opening concert by the Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Music Director Yannick Nezet-Seguin and featuring violinist Joshua Bell and vocalist/double bassist Esperanza Spalding, was scheduled to begin at 7 p.m.,” according to a statement released by Carnegie Hall. “All future performances remain on Carnegie Hall’s schedule, and daily updates will be issued pending resolution of the strike.”

A message from Local One President James J. Claffey Jr. at the I.A.T.S.E. headquarters confirmed the strike and instructed union members to gather at the hall’s West 57th Street address to staff picket lines.

“The strike is on,” Claffey said in a message recorded on his answering machine.

Guilty of tax evasion

H. Ty Warner, the billionaire creator of Beanie Babies plush toys, pleaded guilty to failing to pay taxes on money he hid from the U.S. in a Swiss bank account.

Warner, who was charged with a single count of tax evasion last month, entered his plea Wednesday before U.S. District Judge Charles P. Kocoras in Chicago.

“I am pleading guilty because I am guilty,” Warner, 69, told the judge, leaning close to a lectern microphone as his voice choked with emotion.

Warner agreed to pay a civil penalty of almost $53.6 million. Tax evasion is punishable by as long as five years in prison. He also faces a fine of as much as $250,000. Sentencing is set for Jan. 15.