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Newscaster apologizes for gaffe

A Los Angeles newscaster apologized to Samuel L. Jackson for confusing him with fellow actor Laurence Fishburne during a live TV interview.

KTLA entertainment reporter Sam Rubin was interviewing Jackson on Monday about the film “RoboCop” when he asked the actor if he’d gotten a lot of reaction to his recent Super Bowl commercial.

When Jackson asked, “What Super Bowl commercial?” Rubin realized his mistake and began to apologize. But it was too late.

“You’re as crazy as the people on Twitter,” an animated Jackson, who was doing the interview by satellite from Atlanta, told Rubin. “I’m not Laurence Fishburne. We don’t all look alike. We may be all black and famous but we don’t all look alike.”

As Rubin, who is white, tried to apologize, a smiling Jackson went on at length, listing various black actors and their commercials. Video of the exchange quickly went viral.

Fishburne, as the character Morpheus from the “Matrix” movies, appeared in the Super Bowl commercial for Kia automobiles.

Jackman to host Tonys

Neil Patrick Harris has given way to Hugh Jackman at the Tony Awards.

Producers of the annual telecast celebrating the best of Broadway said Tuesday that Jackman will once again take up hosting duties for the next awards on June 8 at Radio City Music Hall.

It will be Jackman’s fourth time hosting the Tonys. He previously emceed the show from 2003-2005.

Library gets Hemingway trove

Materials from Nobel Prize-winning author Ernest Hemingway’s Cuban home are now available for researchers at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston.

The 2,500 digitally scanned documents were housed at Hemingway’s former Cuban estate, called the Finca Vigía, where he lived for 21 years. He died in 1961. Hemingway wrote many of his works there, including “For Whom the Bell Tolls” and “The Old Man and the Sea.”

This is the first time anyone in the United States can examine the items, which include car insurance for a 1941 Plymouth Station Wagon, a license to carry arms in Cuba, bull fighting tickets and a recipe from his fourth wife for “Papa’s Favorite Hamburger.”

Karon to resume book series

Jan Karon is going back to Mitford.

Nearly a decade after the novelist announced she was done with her multimillion-selling Mitford Years series, she has signed up with G.P. Putnam’s Sons for two more installments about the fictional North Carolina town and such residents as Father Tim Kavanaugh and his wife, Cynthia. The next release, “Somewhere Safe With Somebody Good,” is scheduled for September.

Karon said in a statement issued Tuesday by Putnam that her decision to resume the Mitford series proves that one should “never say never.” She has written nine previous Mitford books, most recently “Light From Heaven,” published in 2005.

Putnam is an imprint of Penguin Random House.