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Our Lady Peace has done what so many of its Canadian rock peers from the 1990s have failed to do – endure with integrity and relevance intact. Back in the mid-’90s, OLP was part of a class of emerging Canadian rock bands that seemed poised to follow in the path paved previously by the Tragically Hip. Acts like I Mother Earth, Moist, Pure and Moxy Fruvous represented a vibrant Canadian music scene, but most of them didn’t survive too long into the next decade. OLP, by contrast, is still here, still strong, still commanding a sizable and devout audience, and, with the release of the new single “Won’t Turn Back,” still making meaningful music some 20 years on. (“Won’t Turn Back” will be available for download in the U.S. on Aug. 26.)

Our Lady Peace will offer its only American gig of 2014, with a set at 8 p.m. Friday in the Rapids Theatre (1711 Main St., Niagara Falls) where Raine Maida and the lads will be joined by Balconies. Tickets – and there are not too many left – are $30 (www.ticketfly.com).

Beach blues

Following a well-received tenure hosting Thursday blues shows in the Central Park Grill, blues aficionado and 97 Rock/WBFO DJ Anita West is moving the party to Woodlawn Beach (3580 Lake Shore Road, Blasdell) from 6 to 10 p.m. today.

“Blues on the Beach” will feature soul-blues powerhouse Dive House Union, and sultry noir-blues/jam outfit Randle & the Late Night Scandals. While the bands perform, a bonfire will rage and a pig will be roasted.

Tickets are $15 advance (call 207-8941) or $20 at the event. A rain date has been set for Aug. 28.

Moby after show

Following tonight’s appearance at Canalside by ambient/electronic/DJ legend Moby, the Buffalo Iron Works is offering a killer free show, pairing livetronica/progressive music ensemble Sonder with a DJ set from EWeazildust, aka Packy Lunn, erstwhile drummer with jam powerhouse Jimkata.

Sonder is a relatively new band and features keyboardist Andy Buck, vocalist/percussionist Ryan Bress and guitarist Mike Pfeil. The band bundles elements of prog rock, jam-band instrumental passages, psychedelia, funk and Middle Eastern influences into an eclectic musical gumbo that eschews reliance on laptops in favor of warm synthesizers and old-school sequencers. The Sonder sound is a thrillingly inventive one, and should provide the perfect aperitif after Moby’s gig.