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Jamestown Revival is a band born from a deep and enduring friendship, and the duo’s music sounds like it. Jonathan Clay and Zach Chance grew up together in Magnolia, Texas, where they nurtured burgeoning affairs with the giants of rock and country music alike, and developed the close-harmony singing style that is a hallmark of the Jamestown Revival sound. Clay and Chance moved to Austin together at the age of 22, and found that city’s surfeit of cross-pollinated American roots music to be thrilling, and in tune with the music they had been conjuring back in Magnolia.

It’s indeed a rare occurrence for a debut album to arrive soaked with maturity and musical depth, but that is certainly the case with “Utah,” Jamestown Revival’s recently released full-length. Fans of Jason Isbell and Justin Townes Earle, for example, should find “Utah” easy to love.

Jamestown Revival makes its Buffalo debut at 9 p.m. Friday in the Sportsmen’s Tavern (326 Amherst St.). The duo will be joined by Wind & Wave and Kris Orlowski. Tickets are $10 advance, $13 day of show (www.sportsmenstavern.com).

Moe. after-show

After you help welcome Moe. home at Canalside on Thursday evening, you have the opportunity to get up close and personal with a few of the band members at the official Moe. after-party, which takes place in Duke’s Bohemian Grove Bar (253 Allen St.) immediately after the Canalside show. Moe.’s Vinnie Amico, a founding member of Grateful Dead tribute ensemble Sonic Garden, will join various alumni from that band, as well as Moe. guitarist Al Schnier and DJ Worehey, for an all-star evening of Grateful Dead tunes.

No boundaries

“Sun Ra and the Three Stooges, it all makes sense to me.” That’s Terry Adams, founder of classic cross-idiom American rock band NRBQ, speaking in the official bio for the band’s new album, “Brass Tacks.”

It’s that dedication to making music that honestly reflects his incredibly broad and diverse musical taste that has served Adams and NRBQ so well for more than 40 years. Consistent throughout that period has been NRBQ’s ability to marry supreme musicianship to music that is touched by joy and is brimming with buoyancy. Fans know it so well – once you fall for NRBQ, you come to rely on the band’s music to bring light and happiness to your playlists. Which may explain why the band can count as serious, longtime fans musician peers like Bonnie Raitt, Ian McLagan and Hal Willner.

An area NRBQ performance is a rare thing these days, which makes Wednesday’s gig in the Sportsmen’s Tavern all the sweeter. Tickets for the 8 p.m. show are $20 (www.sportsmenstavern.net).

BBQ & Blues

The sixth annual BBQ & Blues Bash to benefit Gateway-Longview will take place, rain or shine, at 5 p.m. Friday on Mississippi Street in the area adjacent to the Buffalo Iron Works and First Niagara Center. There will be serious barbecue on offer from the likes of Dinosaur BBQ, Fat Bob’s and Big Belly BBQ, but it’s not all about the food.

Top-tier electric blues journeymen Poppa Chubby and Joanne Shaw Taylor will be performing on the outdoor stage. Buffalo Iron Works also will be hosting the official after-party, beginning at 9 p.m.

Tickets are $25 advance (Ticketfly.com or at the Buffalo Iron Works), and $30 on the day of the show. Tickets cover entertainment, beverages and parking; individual food tickets will be sold. More information is available through www.bbqbluesbash.com.

email: jmiers@buffnews.com