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It was a night of music infused with the frolicking spontaneity of a jamboree, and the complex (oft dark) emotional twang of a western soundtrack. Jaunty Canadian pop quartet Barenaked Ladies, and their openers Whitehorse, played to an adoring crowd at Center for the Arts at University at Buffalo on Wednesday night.

Drummer Tyler Stewart trotted out from the wings to the front of the stage, followed by his three band mates. Lead singer and guitarist Ed Robertson swaggered to his central spot with his trademark grin.

They opened with “Limits,” from “Grinning Streak,” their thirteenth release in a quarter-century. The lyrics begin “Today is not the day to get it done, or not to get it done” is, like many of their songs, about the small triumphs of life.

Barenaked Ladies – simply BNL to their fans – covered most of the tracks of “Grinning Streak,” while also hitting their ultra-familiar crowd-pleasing hits. “Hello Buffalo, it’s nice to see you again,” Robertson said a few bars in before some standup bass riffs by Jim Creeggan, and beatboxing by pianist (and sometime guitarist) Kevin Hearn.

The first five words of “Pinch Me” (“It’s the perfect time of year …”) caused happy screams of recognition. As the band mates sang “I just made you say underwear” a torrent of brassieres hit the stage, what BNL refer to as a “bra buffet.”

One couple in the crowd, Jill and Bill Siradas of Wheatfield, fans of the band since the mid-’90s, were hoping to hear this, their favorite. Nearby an exuberant fan wrapped in a BNL scarf was on his feet and trying to get his entire section to do the same.

Those on the Buffalo music scene in the ’90s are familiar with the music of the band, in heavy rotation on radio and in clubs. The band (originally a quintet) were regulars on Buffalo stages. As a show of solidarity/familiarity the foursome made several references to Queen City culture: “Talkin’ Proud,” Promo the Robot, Commander Tom, suburban names, an attempt at a Buffalo accent (by drummer Stewart), movies shown on Channel 29, and more.

Robertson, an effortless free-styler, riffed on the “Talkin’ Proud” jingle, adding an au courant reference to Toronto Mayor Rob Ford’s drug troubles. Later in their set they would reminisce about a gig played in the early ’90’s at UB, a fest set with Skatalites, Violent Femmes, and Dream Warriors also on the bill, Robertson said.

Highpoints of their seamless set were “Gonna Walk,” a much more swinging song live, and “Maybe Katie,” a shining rendition that felt more Buddy Holly than BNL. Pockets of dancers in the crowd sprung up during “Brian Wilson” and scarf man was on his feet, shouting in ecstasy.

Robertson introduced opening act Whitehorse, fellow Canadians. “You’re in for a real treat,” he told the crowd. And it was a truthful statement. The duo, Luke Doucet and Melissa McClelland, a married couple, worked magic with looped riffs that they sung and played various instruments over – including a few sauce pans. Their song “Devil’s Got a Gun,” amongst others, would be perfect sonic accompaniments for a dusty, sexy cinematic cowboy adventure.