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It’s all about Popeyes

We don’t have cronuts, the croissant-donut hybrid that prompts Manhattanites to wait in line for hours.

But we do have fried chicken.

The opening of Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen in North Buffalo this week was the talk of the town. And the commentary wasn’t always so kind.

An anonymous account from Buffalo Hipster, which can be counted on to be pleasingly snarky, tweeted, “Buffalo: Flipping out over fast food places the rest of the country has since 1983.”

People shared photos of police officers directing traffic and warned friends to avoid Elmwood Avenue around the store as much as possible. Tales of three-hour waits made headlines.

Sometimes those headlines were 400 miles away.

New York magazine weighed in and compared the frenzy here to Brooklyn’s excitement over a new Whole Foods.

Writer Joe Coscarelli called a clip from Time Warner Cable News that described an argument in the drive-thru line “one of the great local news segments of our time.”

However, even Coscarelli had to admit Popeyes beats cronuts.

Buffalo chimneys smoke

Rest easy, children of Buffalo. Or at least the subset of children who celebrate Christmas and will be fortunate enough to have gifts under the tree.

Santa Claus will be able to reach you with no problem.

Buffalo leads other metro areas when it comes to homes for sale that advertise the presence of a chimney, according to an analysis of listings from January 2011 to June 2013 by the real estate website Trulia.

“In the spirit of helping house-hunters maximize their chances of a future visit from Santa, we decided to ask a very important question: Where are homes best equipped for Christmas?,” wrote Trulia’s chief economist, Jed Kolko.

Orange County, Calif., led with the number of house listings that boast a fireplace, but every good elf knows that you can only hang stockings from those.

Santa needs an actual chimney.

Buffalo had 3.9 mentions of chimneys out of every 1,000 listings, beating Philadelphia, which came in second, and our eastern neighbor, Rochester, which came in sixth.

“Santa’s favorite metros – those where the homes are most likely to have chimneys – tend to be cold; his favorite metros also tend to be old,” Kolko wrote.

Yep. Sounds like us.

Cats in high places

The community of animal lovers in Western New York can be a fractious one, populated with people who have strong opinions about what should be done with cats who don’t have homes.

Just witness the recent struggle over control of the Niagara County SPCA.

But in Buffalo City Hall, where the wheels of government can move slowly, a group of volunteers concerned about cat welfare has accomplished its task relatively quickly.

After about six months of work, the cat task force delivered its recommendations to the Common Council during a committee meeting this week. Not only did they successfully work together, people who, let’s just say, don’t always see eye to eye were in agreement in urging lawmakers to adopt their proposal.

Ellicott Council Member Darius G. Pridgen has no particular interest in cats but convened the task force because his constituents were calling him with complaints about the felines that roamed their neighborhoods.

He learned quickly, though, following a sharp push-back from animal enthusiasts, that he should never have used the words “cat” and “license” in the same sentence and decided to leave the matter up to the experts.

Pridgen this week stressed that cat owners could rest easy, knowing that the city won’t be requiring them to obtain licenses, and recalled a message he received from a certain Surrogate’s Court judge.

“I got a card from Judge (Barbara) Howe’s cat saying please don’t put a license on me,” he said.

Maybe the cat will follow up with a thank-you note.

Written by Jill Terreri. email: offmain@buffnews.com