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The size of the snow bands and fluctuations in wind speed and direction have made the Blizzard of 2014 an unusual event, even by our unusual weather standards.

Take Amherst, for example: The town stretches from Niagara Falls Boulevard to Transit Road and from Tonawanda Creek to almost the Buffalo Niagara International Airport and depending on where they live, residents’ experiences can vary widely.

In some West Amherst neighborhoods, north of the University at Buffalo, some residents were still waiting for snow to appear Tuesday afternoon. But sections of the 990 Expressway just a mile away were snow-covered and visibility was diminished.

The farther north motorists traveled, the worse the conditions became.

News Staff Reporter Anne Neville said that by 12:30 p.m., with heavy snow bands moving north into Williamsville and winds howling, visibility declined significantly. Main Street and Wehrle Drive were reported to be covered by whiteout conditions, and a few cars slid off roads and into ditches.

Just to west in the hamlet of Snyder, News Pop Music Critic Jeff Miers said, “a steady descent of fine, powdery snow causes whiteout conditions when it meets with intermittent gusts of wind. Temperatures hover around 5 degrees, but the wind chill factor means it feels like 20 below. No one appears to be driving.”

email: citydesk@buffnews.com