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WASHINGTON – Here are the recent votes of Western New York’s three members of the House of Representatives and the state’s two U.S. senators on major legislation in Congress. A “Y” means the member voted for the measure; an “N” means the member voted against he measure; an “A” means the member did not vote.

House

• Aid to Ukraine and Russia Sanctions – The House concurred in the Senate amendment to the Support for the Sovereignty, Integrity, Democracy, and Economic Stability of Ukraine Act, sponsored by Rep. Harold Rogers, R-Ky. The amendment would provide $1 billion of loan guarantees for Ukraine’s new government, fund democracy, governance and civil society programs in the country, and impose sanctions and asset freezes against Russian officials. Rogers said the bill would send “a very clear message that the United States will not tolerate the Russian incursion into Ukraine, human rights abuses, or corruption.”

The vote April 1 was 378 yeas to 34 nays.

Reps. Chris Collins, R-Clarence, Y; Brian Higgins, D-Buffalo, Y; Tom Reed, R-Corning, Y.

• U.S. Government Broadcasts in Ukraine – The House passed a bill, sponsored by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., that would call for the U.S. government’s Voice of America and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty broadcast services to increase programming efforts in Crimea, Ukraine, and neighboring regions to counter Russian influence over the area. A supporter, Rep. Edward R. Royce, R-Calif., said the programming “is central to our effort to counter Russian aggression and to send the type of support we need for the democratic development of Ukraine.”

The vote April 1 was 399 yeas to 12 nays.

Collins, Y; Higgins, Y; Reed, Y.

• Affordable Care Act and the Workweek – The House passed the Save American Workers Act, sponsored by Rep. Todd C. Young, R-Ind. The bill would define a workweek, for the purpose of the health care reform law’s mandate for employers to provide health insurance for their employees, as 40 hours or more of work, replacing the current standard of 30 hours or more. Young said the 40-hour standard would help “Americans who are just trying to make ends meet. By simply repealing this provision and restoring the traditional 40-hour workweek, we can help make an America that works.” An opponent of the bill, Rep. Sander M. Levin, D-Mich., said it would increase the number of uninsured Americans by half a million and add $74 billion to the deficit.

The vote April 3 was 248 yeas to 179 nays.

Collins, Y; Reed, Y; Higgins, N.

Senate

• Appeals Court Judge – The Senate confirmed the nomination of John B. Owens to serve as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. A supporter, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., cited Owens’ experience as an assistant U.S. attorney in California, official in the Justice Department and, more recently as a partner in the Munger, Tolles & Olson law firm. Feinstein said Owens “has a sterling background and would be an excellent circuit court judge.”

The vote March 31 was 56 yeas to 34 nays.

Sens. Kirsten E. Gillibrand, D-N.Y., Y; Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., Y

• Medicare Payments to Doctors – The Senate passed the Protecting Access to Medicare Act, sponsored by Rep. Joseph R. Pitts, R-Pa. The bill would extend by 13 months measures to avert implementation of the sustainable growth rate formula for calculating Medicare payments to physicians. A supporter, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said the extension would set the stage for Congress to pass a reform plan to end the sustainable growth formula. An opponent of the bill, Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., said it violated by $6 billion spending limits Congress approved in December, using budget gimmicks to offset the cost of not extending the formula.

The vote March 31 was 64 yeas to 35 nays.

Gillibrand, Y; Schumer, Y.

• Amending Unemployment Benefits Bill – The Senate rejected a motion to table an amendment, sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, to the Protecting Volunteer Firefighters and Emergency Responders Act. The amendment would change the enactment date of the bill. An opponent, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, said it was an effort by Senate Democrats to fill the amendment tree for the bill and thereby block Republican efforts to offer amendments that would create jobs and opportunity for workers.

The vote to table the amendment April 2 was 46 yeas to 50 nays.

Gillibrand, N; Schumer, N.

• Disability and Unemployment Benefits – The Senate tabled an appeal of the ruling of the Senate chairman that an amendment, sponsored by Sen. David Vitter, R-La., to the Protecting Volunteer Firefighters and Emergency Responders Act was not in order. The amendment would have barred individuals from receiving both unemployment insurance benefits and disability benefits at the same time. Vitter said it “would save about $1 billion over 10 years” and remedy a situation in which individuals can receive benefits from two programs intended for the fundamentally different purposes of assisting those who cannot work on a long-term basis and assisting those who are temporarily unemployed. An opponent of the amendment, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, called it a diversionary tactic intended to prevent an extension of unemployment insurance benefits.

The vote to table the appeal April 2 was 67 yeas to 29 nays.

Gillibrand, Y; Schumer, Y.

• The Budget and Unemployment Insurance – The Senate agreed to a motion to waive a budgetary point of order concerning the Protecting Volunteer Firefighters and Emergency Responders Act, sponsored by Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Pa., which would extend unemployment insurance benefits for five months, retroactive to Dec. 28. A supporter of the point of order, Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., said the bill violated the Ryan-Murray spending agreement, reached last December, in multiple ways, and used spending gimmicks that would add $5 billion to the government’s debt. An opponent of the point of order, Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., said the bill was necessary to provide the unemployed benefits that give them “a little bit of stability so they can do what is necessary to look for work.”

The vote to waive the point of order April 3 was 60 yeas to 36 nays.

Gillibrand, Y; Schumer, Y.

• Debating Unemployment Benefits Bill – The Senate agreed to a cloture motion to end debate on the Protecting Volunteer Firefighters and Emergency Responders Act, sponsored by Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Pa., which would extend unemployment insurance benefits for five months, retroactive to Dec. 28. An opponent of ending debate, Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, said that the bill would do nothing to help the long-term unemployed and that Republican senators were not being allowed to submit bill amendments that would “create circumstances under which the private sector can create more full-time jobs” and decrease the need for unemployment benefits. A supporter of ending debate, Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., said, “To prevent this legislation from going through is to deny millions of working Americans the support they need to get through a very difficult period.” The vote to end debate April 3 was 61 yeas to 35 nays.

Gillibrand, Y; Schumer, Y.

– Targeted News Service