The Tonawanda Town Board on Monday night unanimously approved a $3 million bond resolution related to a water-line replacement project and the cleaning and painting of a water storage tank.

The project calls for spending $1.8 million to replace the six-inch main along Orchard Drive and Cleveland Drive between Delaware Road and Talbot Road, and Lumney Avenue between Brighton Road and Cleveland Drive, with approximately 2,500 linear feet of eight-inch main and 2,600 feet of 12-inch main.

The improvements come as the town continues to work off of a 2007 water study that prioritized water distribution projects, said Kirk Rowland, division head of water and sewer maintenance for the town.

“These water-line projects are meant to get us more flow and to decrease the pressure loss when flow is being used,” Rowland said.

Councilman Joe Emminger estimated that the town has spent at least $85 million on water and sewer projects over the last five years. Much of the improvements are mandated by the state Department of Environmental Conservation, but others are made to correct town hydrants’ “fire flow issues,” Emminger said.

“It’s also a public safety issue with being able to provide our firefighters the necessary tools they need to fight fires when they arrive,” he said during the board’s regular meeting.

Also planned is the cleaning and painting of the interior and exterior of the one-million-gallon elevated water storage tank at 237 Two Mile Creek Road near the Sheridan Park golf course for $1.2 million. The interior was last painted in 2003, while the exterior was last painted in 1985, Rowland said.

“Cleaning the tank is going to be a little tricky, but we should have that started by early spring so it’s done by mid-summer before we get big usage,” Rowland told the board.

In other business Monday, the board approved a resolution allowing the state Department of Transportation to move water lines during a total reconstruction of the Youngmann Highway’s bridges over Military Road and Delaware Avenue beginning in the spring.

Traffic disruptions will be likely during the major project, which could last a year and a half, Michael J. Kaiser, director of the town’s Technical Support Department, said during a work session Monday afternoon.

“Just grin and bear it,” he said.