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LEWISTON – Daniel R. Gibson was sworn in Monday night as a new trustee on the Village Board, appointed to fill the open seat left vacant when former trustee Dennis J. Brochey took his seat as the new Town of Lewiston supervisor.

When asked to describe himself, Gibson, 57, said, “I am not a politician.” and added, “I’m a new face. I think I’ve got some great ideas.”

He said a lot of people vote for political party lines, but he just wants to do the best for everyone involved in the community.

“This is something I’ve wanted to do for a very long time. I want to be a difference maker,” Gibson said.

He said Lewiston was a “great village,” which he fell in love with as a child driving through the area on a school field trip to Old Fort Niagara, never knowing that he would end up living there.

“I fell in love with this village a long time ago,” he said.

Gibson said he coached Little League and was on the board of directors of Lewiston-Porter Youth Football, and was also a member of the Moose Lodge.

He works as an operations manager in the wardrobe department for Seneca Gaming Corp. He has been married to his wife, Jamie Hibbard Gibson, for 27 years and they have a daughter, Jordan, 23, and a son, Taylor, 16.

Gibson was chosen from a field of six applicants by Mayor Terry C. Collesano and will fill the unexpired term until the village’s June 17 election, when the seat’s remaining two years will be up for grabs. Gibson, a Republican, said he plans to run at that time.

Village Board seats are four-year terms.

Also up for re-election in June will be Collesano, for a new four-year term; and the seats currently held by Trustees Victor E. Eydt and Bruce Sutherland, who also serves as the village’s deputy mayor. Only one seat on the board, held by Trustee Nicholas Conde, will not be on the ballot.

Collesano said of Gibson, “He is no stranger to the Village of Lewiston. He has been a resident here for 28 years and has shown a lot of enthusiasm and a lot of get up and go. We are proud to have him join our board.”

In other business, the Village Board, both before and after its meeting, met with the historic planning and preservation commission and Zoning Board to discuss a number of changes in the signage law.

Among the changes expected to be made in the lengthy list of codes are restrictions on free-standing signs, such as sandwich board signs, that would prohibit their use in a village right of way, as well as require permits and fees for temporary signs for events like blood drives. The fee is expected to stop groups from erecting signs and then not removing them after an event is concluded.

The new law still needs to be reviewed by the village attorney before it can go before the Village Board.

email: nfischer@buffnews.com