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Supreme Court ruling opens a can of worms

It would seem that the Supreme Court has opened a real can of worms in its decision in the Hobby Lobby case. It has decided that “sincerely held” religious beliefs of small privately held corporations must be considered and employees denied access to contraceptive health care. This “narrow?” decision comprises almost 90 percent of corporate America, and sincerely held beliefs are countless. Does this mean that the courts are now the final arbiters in religious disputes?

Over thousands of years, many different versions of the Bible and religious books of many faiths have appeared. Prophets, popes, saints, priests, rabbis, imams, et al. have cited their select verses to proclaim the truth as they see it. Every person of faith holds sincerely held beliefs. In his decision, Justice Samuel Alito compounded the problem by suggesting that exceptions might be made in the case of blood transfusions, immunizations, etc.

The Hobby Lobby family believes (erroneously) that some birth control methods result in abortion. Not everyone is of the same opinion. Religious freedom means that one can say what you want and believe what you want as long as you respect the right of others to do the same.

You only have to look to the Mideast and find utter chaos because of “sincerely beliefs” run amok.

Henry N. Stahl Jr.

Amherst