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Local developer Bryan Young showed the Elma Town Board preliminary sketches for 54 patio and 18 single-family homes he would like to build on the former Camp Centerland site at a work session Wednesday.

Working with Young on the development are R. Christopher Wood, an engineer with Carmina Wood Morris of Buffalo, and attorney Sean Hopkins, of Hopkins and Sorgi.

Hopkins said that Young, who bought the land last year, “had planned to build multiple four-family apartment buildings but switched gears when the town’s moratorium went into effect.”

The patio home site, called Brookside Patio Homes, would be built on 32.9 acres behind the Pondbrook Homes. They would be accessed by a road Young purchased between the Elma Plaza and the townhouses. The patio homes could be 1,500 to 2,100 square feet, according to Hopkins.

The project would be presented to the Planning Board next week as a cluster development of 1.64 units per acre, which would leave 72.9 percent of the land permanent open space. Clustering requires the approval of the Town Board by state law.

The patio home project is conditional on Pondbrook agreeing to allow the patio homes to tap into the Pondbrook sewer plant.

The second project would be called Running Brook, a subdivision of 18 single-family homes on a 44.9-acre site consisting of 14 homes on three-quarter-acre lots and four homes on lots of five or more acres.

These homes would have their own septic systems. They would be accessed by new public roads built off Bullis Road.

An archaeological study would be required on the site.

Hopkins and Wood cautioned that this is just an informal preliminary action before the Town Board, and they expect Young will have a lengthy process to go through relating to environmental issues, including wetlands, traffic studies and other studies.

Also at the meeting:

• Jay Macaluso asked for a permit to build storage units on a 100-by-1,500-foot deep vacant lot he owns on Jamison Road. He wants to build four 40-by-160-foot storage units with one overhead door and one manual door per unit. Macaluso said he plans to rent them to Moog for storage. Hours of operation would be 8 a.m. to 6 p.m Monday through Saturday. The board took no action, and the request must go before the Planning Board at its meeting Tuesday.

• Water Superintendent Eugene Stevenson reported that he bought 24 high-tech water meters to save money before the meters go up in price in February.

The new meters allow a meter reader to drive by a house with a device that will pick up the reading, eliminating the need for the homeowner to go down the basement to get a reading.

He said the goal is to have all homes in Elma with these meters eventually. It would save on administration costs.

The new meters cost $245, and they are primarily used now for new home builds, for those who need to replace their old meters or just don’t want to go down in the basement anymore. A deposit is returned when the homeowner sells the house.