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The Town of Elma Conservation Board’s recommendation to save 38 acres of farmland at 641 Ostrander Road in perpetuity was approved last week by the Town Board.

It was the first piece of land put into the Conservation Easement Program since the Conservation Board was formed seven years ago.

At a public hearing, several neighbors stood to voice their support for the easement.

The property is currently being farmed and can be farmed forever or left fallow. Nothing can be built on this site owned by the Daniel K. Rupp family. If the land is sold, the easement goes with the land.

The Rupps will get a 90 percent tax break equivalent to $611 a year that the town will assume for them in school and county taxes.

This amount will be spread over all the taxpayers in Elma, which amounts to one or two pennies each, according to Councilman James Malczewski Jr.

Supervisor Dennis M. Powers said that there are more than a dozen applicants for easements on the waiting list and that he hopes this is the first of many that “will keep our town rural.”

Also at last week’s meeting, the board:

• Approved a six-month extension of the multidwelling code. The current moratorium expires Aug. 12. A public hearing on the code is set for July 16.

• Authorized the supervisor to sign an intermunicipal agreement with the Iroquois School District to hire retired State Police Officer Joseph J. DePlato full time as the special resource officer for safety and security for the school and the community.

The school will pay his salary and provide him an office, office supplies and computer. The Town of Elma will supply him with a uniform and vehicle.

DePlato worked as a special resource officer twice for Iroquois and was twice let go because of budget cuts.

• Received three quotes for construction work, including a press box and storage for Elma-Marilla-Wales Sports. The low bidder is Custom Builders, for $24,950. All three bidders were Elma contractors.

The costs will be divided among Elma, Marilla and Wales, based on enrollment. The Water Department workers tore down the old tower, and the Highway Department will do grading and stonework.

The construction is to start the first week in July and be completed by midmonth. According to an agreement with Marilla and Wales, all three towns that use the fields contribute to the capital improvements.

Elma will contribute 66 percent; Marilla, 23 percent; and Wales, 11 percent. Concrete work also must be done, and the town is looking for donations. The name Arrowhead Field will remain.

• Added its endorsement to the Town of Marilla to forward a request to revoke permits from the state Department of Environmental Conservation to spread “equate” fertilizer made by Quasar Energy Group on agricultural land in Erie, Niagara and Wyoming counties.