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Collectors sometimes find an unusual “go-with” for their collection. Collectors buy a standard one-sheet movie poster, 27-by-41 inches, or a three-sheet, 40-by-81 inches, or a half-sheet, 22-by-28 inches, or lobby cards that usually are 11-by-14 inches. Sometimes a full set of lobby cards – seven scene cards and one title card – is found. There also are cardboard window cards, autographs, promotional items, jewelry, T-shirts, toys and games, all related to a movie.

A lucky find for movie buffs this year was a jigsaw puzzle made with a photograph of Susan Hayward (1917-1975), a movie star and leading lady from 1937 to 1972. While there are many movie-star paper dolls, there are very few jigsaw puzzles.

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Q: My grandmother was married in 1899 and received a curvy birch bedroom dresser and chest as a gift. Both pieces are mounted with a beveled mirror in a carved wooden frame. My mother wasn’t fond of the furniture, but she kept it and now we’re using it because we can tell its quality is a lot better than anything else we own. The label on the back of each piece says “Robert Mitchell Furniture Co., Cincinnati, Ohio.” Please tell us about the manufacturer and the furniture’s value.

A: Robert Mitchell was an Irish immigrant who partnered with Frederick Rammelsberg to open a furniture-making business in Cincinnati in the 1830s or ’40s. Mitchell & Rammelsberg incorporated in 1867. In 1881, after Rammelsberg had died, the corporate name was changed to Robert Mitchell Furniture Co. It remained in business until about 1940. Any Victorian-era furniture made by Mitchell & Rammelsberg or Robert Mitchell Furniture Co. is high-quality and prized by collectors.

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Q: My 85-year-old mother-in-law gave my wife and me a six-sided large glass Planters Peanuts jar she has had for years.

She told us her aunt worked in a bar a long time ago and the jar was on the counter for patrons to reach in and grab peanuts. There are fired-on yellow Mr. Peanut images around the outside of the jar, which has its original glass lid with a peanut finial. Are these old jars collectible?

A: Planters Peanuts have been around since 1906, and Mr. Peanut became the company’s logo in 1916. Jars like yours have been made in many shapes and styles since then, but yours probably is the six-sided jar made in 1936.

If your jar is in excellent condition, it could be worth $50 to $100. Advertising collectors love Mr. Peanut.