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It’s not unusual to recycle parts from an old, crumbling home and use them as your own. An entry door, crown molding, maybe a bathtub.

But what about an entire house?

That’s what Buffalo ReUse wants to do with a four-bedroom Cape Cod in Getzville.

The nonprofit on East Ferry Street – known for salvaging materials from old buildings and selling them to the public – is taking recycling to the next level by offering to dismantle a 1,300-square-foot house on Hopkins Road at a reasonable price so it can be reassembled elsewhere.

It comes with a matching two-car garage, too.

“It’s not everyday somebody wants to move a house in good constructional condition,” said Vincent Kuntz, board president of Buffalo ReUse. “It’s our first one quite like this, but I’m confident we could do it.”

The owner built another home on the property and donated the old Cape – built in 1952 – to the organization for demolition and reuse of the building materials.

But the house is in good shape and Kuntz had the idea of moving it as an alternative to demolition.

Buffalo ReUse has thought about those possibilities for some time, but didn’t have quite the right house until now.

“The idea was ‘Let’s try to do this a different way,’ ” Kuntz said, “because we can have even less waste if we find a way to use it before we even take it down.”

The house could potentially be picked up off the foundation and moved by flatbed, Kuntz said.

But that could get costly and complicated depending on where it is moved, and the obstructions along the way, he said.

The alternative would be to take the house apart in large sections, load them on a trailer and reassemble them at a new location.

“It really is the reverse of building,” said Kuntz of Alliance Builders, which specializes in restoring pre-World War II buildings.

Kuntz sees the house as a possible vacation home or hunting lodge or “granny flat.”

The house has drawn some attention, but so far no offers. Those interested can email info@buffaloreuse.org.

The estimated cost for Buffalo ReUse to dismantle the home and prepare it for moving would start at $20,000, $2,500 for the garage. But the final figure is hard to determine without knowing where the house will be rebuilt, Kuntz said.

Whatever money is raised could go a long way toward helping the nonprofit get back on its feet.

While Buffalo ReUse is still active, its building on East Ferry was condemned by the city over the summer because of violations.

The organization has been trying to work with the city to reopen the building, but renovations are going to be costly, Kuntz said.

Kuntz said Buffalo ReUse has been clearing out old inventory and soon plans to start selling some items on the sidewalk alongside the building.

email: jrey@buffnews.com