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Maj. Patrick W. Miller, the Allegany native who was among those wounded during last week’s shooting at Fort Hood, Texas, reportedly worked to rescue others even after he had been shot.

Stars and Stripes, the U.S. Army newspaper, reported over the weekend that Rep. John R. Carter, the congressman whose district includes the giant Army base, credited Miller with herding soldiers behind an office door and out of harm’s way as Spc. Ivan A. Lopez riddled the area with rounds from a civilian handgun.

Three soldiers were killed and 16 wounded in Wednesday’s shooting. Lopez, who was reportedly angry after an argument with superiors over a request for leave, killed himself when confronted by military police.

Carter, a Republican, was quoted by Stars and Stripes as calling Miller “a very courageous young man.”

Stars and Stripes said Miller, a veteran of two tours of duty in the Iraq War, reacted instantly when he heard the gunfire. He rushed to get other soldiers into an office as Lopez started shooting.

Carter said Miller was shot “in the gut,” but kept working to move other soldiers to safety.

Stars and Stripes reported that the Southern Tier soldier put pressure on his own wound and kept moving the other men along.

Friday, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, said he had spoken to a soldier who was shot in the abdomen but stepped forward to save another soldier before calling 911. Cruz did not give the name of the soldier he talked to.

Miller’s family declined to comment on the Stars and Stripes report when reached Sunday by The Buffalo News.

Miller, a brigade comptroller at Fort Hood since last August, has undergone two operations, one to stabilize his condition and another to repair his colon, family and friends have told The News. A doctor said Thursday that all the wounded were expected to survive. Miller is an alumnus of St. Bonaventure University’s ROTC program. Miller’s wasn’t the only example of heroism during Wednesday’s shooting.

Sgt. 1st Class Daniel M. Ferguson of Mulberry, Fla., who was killed, was credited with saving others by blocking a door with his body. A chaplain also used his body to shield others, Lt. Gen. Mark Milley, the base commander, said Friday.

email: tprohaska@buffnews.com