ADVERTISEMENT

Tim Hortons opens new site in former Arby’s restaurant

Tim Hortons opened its latest location Wednesday in downtown Buffalo.

The new shop, which is combined with a Cold Stone Creamery ice cream store, replaces a former Arby’s location at 537 Delaware Ave. near Allen Street. That restaurant closed in September after 35 years in business.

The new location boasts the chain’s new, upscale concept with a flat-screen television, free wi-fi and more comfortable seating.

Tim Hortons recently announced it would open 800 new restaurants in North America, 300 of them in the United States, by 2018.

“That includes the new markets we listed – St. Louis, Fort Wayne, Fargo, Youngstown – as well as our current markets, including Buffalo,” said Brynn Burton, a Tim Hortons spokeswoman.

Target tech chief resigns

NEW YORK (AP) — Target Corp.’s executive ranks have suffered their first casualty since hackers stole credit card numbers and other personal data of millions of the retailer’s shoppers last year.

The nation’s second largest discounter told the Associated Press that Beth Jacob, who has overseen everything from Target’s web site to its internal computer systems as Chief Information Officer since 2008, has resigned. The company said it will search for an interim CIO.

The departure, which was effective on Wednesday, comes as Target works to overhaul some of its divisions that handle security and technology following the massive data breach. Target said the resignation was Jacob’s idea, but some analysts speculate that the executive has faced intense scrutiny as the company tries to restore its reputation among investors and shoppers.

The resignation points to the changing roles and demands on CIOs. They’ve long assumed a behind-the-scenes position overseeing not only technology, but the overall safety and security of company systems. But security experts say more is being demanded of them as the public becomes more aware of big security breaches.

Businesses adding jobs

WASHINGTON (AP) — A private survey shows that U.S. companies added slightly more jobs in February than in the previous month, but harsh winter weather weighed on hiring for the third straight month.

Payroll processor ADP said Wednesday that businesses added 139,000 jobs last month, up from only 127,000 in January. But January’s figure was revised sharply lower from an original estimate of 175,000.

The data suggests that the government’s jobs report for February, to be released Friday, will show only modest gains. Economists forecast it will show that employers added 145,000 jobs in February. That is below the average gains of nearly 205,000 jobs a month in the first 11 months of last year.

The ADP numbers cover only private businesses and often diverge from the government’s more comprehensive report. In January and December, its initial figures were much higher than the official count.

The Labor Department said employers added 113,000 jobs in January and just 75,000 in December.

Service-sector index falls

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. service companies expanded more slowly in February as hiring levels declined in a cautionary sign for the economy coming out of winter.

The Institute for Supply Management said Wednesday that its service-sector index fell to 51.6 from 54 in January. Any reading above 50 indicates expansion.