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NEW YORK – GPS will tell you how to get to the nearest Apple store. With iBeacon, Apple hopes to guide you around once you’re inside, whether it’s to pick up an order, upgrade to a new iPhone or shop for a pair of headphones.

The implications of iBeacon go beyond Apple stores. One day, commuters might get information on subway delays as they stand on the platform, while museum visitors might get details on the painting they are standing in front of. Other retailers also will be able to offer deals or track which aisles shoppers linger in the longest.

In-store location technology does raise privacy concerns, though many shoppers have shown a willingness to be tracked if there’s something in it for them.

“With any new technology, you don’t know how it’s going to be used until it is being used,” technology analyst Rob Enderle said.

He said Apple “is pretty good” at getting people to use new technologies, but it could take years for iBeacon to mature and reach its potential. He said Google, Microsoft and other tech companies will likely follow suit with location technology.

On Friday, Apple Inc. began using the technology at its 254 U.S. stores to send messages about products, events and other information – tailored to where you are inside, provided you have downloaded the Apple Store app and have given Apple permission to track you.

Using the iBeacon feature, the app will notify you if the computer you ordered is ready for pickup, for example. Show a clerk your screen with the order number, and the clerk will get it for you. Walking by an iPhone table? You may get a message asking if you want to upgrade, check your upgrade availability and see if you can get money for trading in your old phone.