ADVERTISEMENT

WASHINGTON – Americans bought fewer existing homes in September than the previous month, held back by higher mortgage rates and rising prices.

The National Association of Realtors said Monday that sales of re-sold homes fell 1.9 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.29 million. That’s down from a pace of 5.39 million in August, which was revised lower.

The sales pace in August equaled July’s pace. Both were the highest in four years and are consistent with a healthy market.

Mortgage rates rose sharply over the summer from their historic lows, threatening to slow a housing recovery that began last year and has helped drive modest economic growth.

But many economists expect home sales will remain healthy, especially now that rates have stabilized and remain near historically low levels. Final sales in September reflected contracts signed in July and August, when rates were about a percentage point higher than in May.

The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage was 4.28 percent last week, down from a two-year high of 4.58 percent in August. That’s also far below the 30-year average of 7 percent, according to Bankrate.com.

Sales of existing homes have risen at a healthy 10.7 percent in the past 12 months. Still, that’s the slowest year-over-year increase in five months.

And the median home price has risen 11.7 percent in the past year, the Realtors association said. That’s also the slowest annual gain in the past five months.

Price increases may be slowing because more homes are finally coming on the market. The supply of available homes rose 1.8 percent from a year ago to 2.21 million, the first year-over-year increase in 2½ years.

The limited number of homes for sale is a key reason prices have risen so fast in the last year.