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Crews to host ‘Millionaire’

Terry Crews is going in for Cedric The Entertainer as new host of “Who Wants To Be a Millionaire.”

Crews, an actor, former NFL player and Old Spice pitchman, will join the weekday game show starting this fall, according to its studio, Disney-ABC Domestic Television.

He replaces comedian Cedric The Entertainer, who’s hosting the show in its 12th season in national syndication.

Crews has been a regular this season on the freshman Fox sitcom “Brooklyn Nine-Nine.” His films include Tyler Perry’s “The Single Moms Club” and Ivan Reitman’s “Draft Day.” His first book, “Manhood,” will be out this month.

Cohen diaries coming in fall

Television executive and personality Andy Cohen has more to spill about the glamorous life.

Publisher Henry Holt and Company announced Wednesday that Cohen has a deal for “The Andy Cohen Diaries.” According to Holt, his book is scheduled for release in the fall and will be a gossipy feast, featuring A-list stars, reality stars, family members and cab drivers.

And a dog.

The 45-year-old Cohen is a popular talk show guest, the executive producer of Bravo Media’s “Watch What Happens Live” and an executive producer of “The Real Housewives” shows. His previous book, “Most Talkative,” came out in 2012.

Springsteen altered ‘Born’ lyrics

Bruce Springsteen wasn’t thinking about Wendy when he wrote a first draft of his 1975 classic “Born to Run.” Instead, he’s got a gold Chevy 6 on his mind, according to the original lyrics, which make their public debut this week at Duke University.

The 30 lines of lyrics, written in pen on a piece of 8.5.-by-11-inch lined paper, were purchased last December at a Sotheby’s auction by Floyd Bradley, a California man whose daughter graduates this weekend from Duke, as does Springsteen’s daughter.

Bradley, 62, a retired computer software marketer who spent much of his life in London, paid $160,000 plus a commission, bringing the total to $197,000. “It was a lot. I was embarrassed to tell my children,” he said. “But they were very supportive after I told them.”

He bought them as an investment, he said. “It’s a piece of Americana, I think.”

The original lyrics, written in 1974, in Long Branch, New Jersey, bear little resemblance to the anthem that Springsteen typically plays each concert with the house lights on and the audience on its feet. But that familiar chorus of “tramps like us/baby we were born to run” is there as is a part that ended up much like the final version: “this town’ll rip the bones from your back/it’s A suicide trap/your dead unless you get out while your young.”

The “everlasting kiss” is there: “I was headin for the place where wild Angels die in An everlasting (or) neverending kiss.”

But there’s no mention of dying with Wendy during that kiss or of guarding Wendy’s dreams and visions. Instead, Springsteen “looked out cross my hood + saw the highway buckle neath the wheels of A gold Chevy 6.” The car got a second mention a few lines down: “Baby out there heroes are crushed to death behind the wheels of a gold Chevy 6.”