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The Bacon Bomb

Other people go to the fair to ride rides and eat Bacon Bombs. Buzz likes to wander, going behind the scenes, getting underfoot. In the pig barn, a kid let us brush his pig, named Swirly. “He’s so cute,” we cooed, brushing Swirly’s bristly back. “Well,” the boy replied unsentimentally, “I’m selling him.” Then we saw a poster, on the side of the pen, detailing the parts of the pig: loin, ham, etc. The kid had drawn it himself. Oh cruel world! Swirly is going to be a Bacon Bomb! Behind the Showplex, we fell in love with the cattle waiting their turn on parade. One winning heifer was named Lady Antebellum. A little boy, all in white, nestled cheek to cheek with a coal-black steer. The best was a massive animal, brown and white, being led in by a man in overalls. “Watch out,” the man called out. “There’s no telling where the big guy will go.”

The fairest of the fair

One of the greatest exhibits of the Erie County Fair is, in Buzz’s experience, the parking lot. Last time we went, our car got stuck in the mud and had to be pulled out by a tractor. Whee! This time around, we lost our car. And as we were standing there, two handsome brown horses galloped up. And on their backs sat two handsome cops. “Lost your car, little lady?” they said. Or something like that. “Yes,” we said. The cops took our alarm gizmo and went riding around until, finally, their efforts were rewarded by a distant car alarm. They galloped back. “Here you go,” they said, gallantly, pointing out our car. Dazzled, we thanked them and patted the horses. You’d think we had petted enough animals! But there’s always room for more.

On the Erie Canal

The Canal Street String Band played last week at the Ruins, the little natural amphitheater by the Commercial Slip. They did songs from the glory days of Canal Street. “It’s like Chippewa Street 150 years ago,” guitarist Dave Ruch told the crowd, putting it kindly. We were thrilled to learn that our Erie Canal songs are universal. You know the one that goes “I scarcely think we’ll get a drink/Till we get to Buffalo”? A song from the C&O Canal (it stands for Chesapeake and Ohio) went: “I ain’t got no whiskey but I will have some/When I get to Washington.”

Suggestion box

Rich McCarthy of North Buffalo writes: “I look at the stressed-out parents and office workers arriving home on a sweltery evening and hear the mind-numbing repetitive tune from the ice cream truck.” Yeah, Buzz knows that vanilla tune. He continues: “What if we adults had our own frozen treat truck, offering myriad frozen mixed drinks! I’m willing to bet the truck could play an air raid siren repetitively and the curbs would still be lined with grown men and women clutching their $10s and $20s.” We bet! We asked McCarthy if we could use his name. “Sure,” he said. “I put the suggestion on my Facebook page and am still getting positive hits.”

The Buzz

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Quote

“I had someone else before I had you/And I’ll have someone after you’ve gone.”

– 1925 ditty sung by the Canal Street String Band