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Dear Abby: On behalf of my fellow museum docents, I’m asking you to educate your readers about how to behave when they visit our nation’s historic buildings. The most important rule is: Do Not Touch Anything! This includes the walls and woodwork. Even the cleanest hands have skin oils that can damage a finish.

Next, do not lean against the walls or doorways because this, too, may damage original paint, wood finishes or carved details. If ropes are blocking access to part of the room, do not go beyond them. The dirt on your shoes can damage carpets. If a door is closed or only half open, do not move it.

As a courtesy to your guide and other visitors, cellphones should be turned off. The docent has important information to share with you. If we do not have an immediate answer to a question, we will seek it from another guide or staff member. Guides and docents enjoy sharing our knowledge with guests. So please visit, but while you’re with us, follow our guidelines and help us preserve and protect these glimpses into the past.

– Docent in Portland, Ore.

Dear Docent: Your letter deserves space in my column because people sometimes forget when touring historic buildings that they are not in their own homes, but in fact are in museums. May I add one more tip to your list: It is always a good idea to ask permission before using a camera with a flashbulb.

Docents are individuals who study their subjects intensively, and then function as unpaid teachers who transmit their knowledge to visitors in institutions such as museums, art galleries and zoos. They perform an important service and should be treated with respect for the time and effort they put forth to prepare themselves for it.

Experience will teach mom

Dear Abby: My mother refuses to get a cellphone. I know she isn’t afraid of technology (she has a tablet and an e-reader). Her explanation for how to handle an emergency is: “We will handle it like we did before there were cellphones.” I had to remind her of the limited availability of pay phones or courtesy phones nowadays.

Abby, it bothers me that she chooses not to have one. I find it hurtful that an easy way to handle family emergencies is being ignored. It’s a simple solution. A prepaid cellphone with a big-numbered keyboard would be a good way for us to be on the same page. Any advice?

– Out Of Touch in Glens Falls

Dear Out Of Touch: Yes. Stop nagging your mother because it’s not working. Experience is the most effective teacher. Your mother will not appreciate what a blessing a cellphone can be until she learns the hard way what it’s like to need one and not have one. This may seem negative, but it’s the truth.