Fantasia heads to Broadway

Grammy Award-winner Fantasia Barrino will star in the Broadway-bound “After Midnight,” a musical revue celebrating Duke Ellington’s years at the famous Cotton Club nightclub in Harlem.

Producers said Thursday that Barrino, last seen on Broadway in “The Color Purple,” will be their first guest star in the show. Performances start Oct. 18, with an official opening night set for Nov. 3. Barrino ends her run Feb. 9.

Directed and choreographed by Warren Carlyle with musical direction by Wynton Marsalis, the show appeared off-Broadway last year at New York City Center under the name “Cotton Club Parade.” Songs include “Stormy Weather” and “I’ve Got the World on a String.”

Yankee Doodle Anthony

Apparently, some people need to be reminded that Marc Anthony is an American.

The New York-born singer of Puerto Rican descent touted his roots on “Live with Kelly and Michael” on Thursday after some people criticized his selection to sing “God Bless America” at this week’s Major League Baseball All-Star Game, held in New York City.

The Grammy-winning salsa star said that he heard people were questioning why a foreign-born person was singing the patriotic song. Anthony said he was born in New York and added: “You can’t get more New York than me.”

Similar comments were made last month when a Texas-born 11-year-old mariachi singer sang the national anthem during the NBA finals. Both Anthony and the child are Latino.

Leaks reporter gets book deal

The reporter central to revealing the massive U.S. government surveillance efforts has a book deal.

The Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald signed with Metropolitan Books, an imprint of Macmillan, for a book to be published in March. Metropolitan announced Thursday that the book would include additional material on government operations and its “extraordinary cooperation” with private companies.

Greenwald is a journalist and commentator for the Guardian whose reports have been based on documents leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden. Greenwald has written three books in which he argues the government trampled on personal rights in the name of national security.

The Boss sings for Trayvon

Bruce Springsteen dedicated his protest song “American Skin (41 Shots)” to teenager Trayvon Martin during a concert in Limerick, Ireland.

In a video posted online, the 63-year-old singer told the crowd Tuesday: “We’ll send this as a letter back home for justice for Trayvon Martin” after noticing a fan’s sign that read “American Skin (41 Shots).”

George Zimmerman was acquitted Saturday of second-degree murder and manslaughter charges in Martin’s death. Zimmerman said he fired his gun in self-defense during a confrontation with the 17-year-old in Sanford, Fla.

Lyrics in the song include “you can get killed just for living in your American skin.” Springsteen wrote the song about the 1999 police shooting death of Guinean immigrant Amadou Diallo.