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1. Babe Ruth (119 in 1921); Lou Gehrig (117 in 1927); Barry Bonds (107 in 2001); Chuck Klein (107 in 1930); Todd Helton (105 in 2001). Helton also had 103 extra-base hits in 2000.

2. Johnny Murphy. Murphy, who hired Gil Hodges as Mets manager, died of a heart attack at age 61 before the start of the 1970 season.

3. In order of career batting average: Ichiro Suzuki, Derek Jeter, Ryan Braun, Hanley Ramirez, David Wright, Alex Rodriguez, Carlos Gonzalez.

4. Eric Gagne. He did it for the Dodgers in 2002-03. Gagne won the Cy Young Award in ’03; he’s the only NL reliever to do so in the last 20 years.

5. Manny Ramirez and Sammy Sosa. Ramirez had 165 RBIs for the 1999 Indians. Sosa drove in 160 for the 2001 Cubs. Can you say s-t-e-r-o-i-ds?

6. Frank Tanana and Chuck Finley. Tanana had 240 wins and 2,773 strikeouts; Finley 200 wins and 2,610 K’s. They’re fourth and fifth on the career strikeout list among lefthanders.

7. Mickey Mantle (536) is a gimme. Lance Berkman (366) hit exactly one homer for the Yanks in 2010. The others are Chili Davis (350), Mark Teixeira (341) and Ruben Sierra (306).

8. Roberto Hernandez, who had 161 saves for the White Sox and 101 saves for the Rays in the 1990s. He’s not to be confused with the Roberto Hernandez now pitching for the Rays, who used to go under the name of Fausto Carmona.

9. Adrian Beltre (367), Lance Berkman (366); Carlos Beltran (353), Jason Bay (222), Ryan Braun (211).

10. Scott Williamson. He hurt his arm the next season and recorded just one more save in his career.

11. Casey Stengel, of course. “The Old Perfessor” played for the Dodgers and Giants. Stengel managed the Dodgers, Yankees and Mets. He also homered to win Game Three of the ’23 Series, but the Yankees won it in six.

12. Ramiro Mendoza got the save in the clinching game of the 1999 ALCS against Boston, a 6-1 Yankee win.

13. Alfonso Soriano had 128 runs, 209 hits, 51 doubles, 41 steals and 39 homers for the 2002 Yankees. A year later, they traded him for Alex Rodriguez.

14. Bob Stanley, the current Bisons pitching coach.

15. Tommy Davis, who had 27 homers and 153 RBIs for the Dodgers in 1962. It didn’t hurt to have Maury Wills steal 104 bases in front of him.

16. Jack Aker.

17. Gary Sheffield. He did it for the Padres (1992), Marlins (’96), Dodgers (1999, 2000, ’01), Braves (’03) and Yankees (’04, ’05). Fred McGriff had 30 homers for five teams, but didn’t drive in 100 runs with each.

18. Billy Wagner (422), John Wetteland (330), Bob Wickman (267), Todd Worrell (256) and Hoyt Wilhelm (227). C.J. Wilson is active leader with 52.

19. Cesar Tovar.

20. Darren Oliver, now of the Blue Jays. I neglected to mention that his dad, Bob Oliver, hit 27 homers for the 1970 Royals.

21. Jeff Reardon (‘85 Expos, ‘88 Twins, ‘91 Red Sox), John Wetteland (‘93 Expos, ‘96 Yankees, ‘98-99 Rangers), Jose Mesa (‘95 Indians, ‘01 Phils, ‘04 Pirates), Francisco Cordero (‘04 Rangers, ‘07 Brewers, ‘10 Reds).

22. Curt Flood had 178 singles for the 1964 Cardinals. Flood became famous for fighting baseball’s reserve clause, which he chronicled in his book, “The Way It Is.”

23. Ichiro Suzuki won the ‘01 MVP with Seattle. His current Yankee teammate, C.C. Sabathia, was runner-up with the Indians. Alfonso Soriano, a Yankee at the time, finished third.

24. Lindy McDaniel.

25. Marco Scutaro.