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Feb. 25, 1927 – June 25, 2013

Appleton Fryer, a Buffalo businessman, active community leader and longtime honorary consul general of Japan, died Tuesday in Buffalo General Medical Center after a brief illness. He was 86.

Known as “Tony,” Mr. Fryer was born in Buffalo. He was a 1945 graduate of St. Mark’s School in Southborough, Mass., and earned a bachelor’s degree from Princeton University in 1950.

He served briefly with the Navy in the mid-1940s and with the Army in the early 1950s.

Mr. Fryer held many positions in the business and financial fields. He was the founder, in 1956, and longtime owner of Duo-Fast of Western New York, a Cheektowaga distributor of compressed air equipment.

After selling Duo-Fast in 1984, Mr. Fryer was among the investors, and served as publisher, of the short-lived Buffalo Business Journal, which was purchased by the parent company of Business First in late 1986.

Meanwhile, he was appointed in 1979 as Buffalo’s first honorary consul general of Japan, whose duties included promoting cultural exchanges between Japan and the United States, and overseeing the rights and interests of Japanese citizens in Buffalo. Before that, he was an active member and chairman of the Buffalo-Kanazawa Sister Cities Committee.

In 2002, Mr. Fryer was awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasurer, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon, by the consulate general of Japan.

Extremely active in community affairs, he was founder and the first president of the Landmark Society of the Niagara Frontier.

He also was a former president of the Buffalo & Erie County Historical Society, a member of Erie County’s Preservation Advisory Board and a trustee of the Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site Foundation.

Mr. Fryer also was involved in cultural, educational, patriotic, religious, service and fraternal organizations.

Survivors include his wife of 60 years, the former Angeline Kenefick; three sons, Appleton Jr., Daniel K. and Robert L.; and a daughter, Catherine A.

A memorial service will be at 11 a.m. July 11 in Trinity Episcopal Church, 371 Delaware Ave.