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Jamie McGuire, a newer author to the best-seller list, made her fame with the publication of her book “Beautiful Disaster.” The love story between bad boy Travis Maddox and Abby Abernathy, a girl trying to escape her past, has become one of “those” love stories.

The names Abby and Travis are making their way up there with other famous couples of the day, such as Bella and Edward. Abby and Travis’ relationship is filled with many heart-wrenchingly beautiful scenes of young love, as well as a dose of difficulties found in many real relationships. With the success of her book, McGuire decided to flip the point of view from Abby to Travis in her follow-up novel, “Walking Disaster.”

While almost everyone enjoys a new way to read one of their favorite stories, it can be tricky to tell the same story without boring or possibly angering the previous audience. Unfortunately, McGuire was not able to pull off such a feat with “Walking Disaster.” The much-anticipated take on the beloved tale from Travis’ side did not seem to bring anything new to the table; all of Travis’ thoughts and feelings described in this book were almost exactly what the first book described. There were only brief parts of the story where Abby was not involved in the first book and a few new parts of the story that provided excitement. Since much of the original book was dialogue, readers will be rereading many of the same conversations that were in the original story. Only short areas of “Walking Disaster” were dedicated to deeper reflection on Travis’ feelings and thoughts, despite the fact that the main point of rewriting a book from another character’s point of view is to help the audience get a closer look into this character’s mindset. A more in-depth analysis of Travis’ reactions to the events and dialogue in the book is what all of McGuire’s dedicated fans were expecting.

One of the biggest letdowns of this book was that the author decided that certain parts of the story – parts that many readers anticipated the most – only received a mention in this book. Avid readers of the first book will be disappointed, and even possibly angered, by this lack of dedication to describing Travis’ experience in its entirety.

Any lover of McGuire’s first book “Beautiful Disaster” should take the time to read the new installment of Abby and Travis’ struggles, but readers should be warned that it does not live up to the original.

Rachel Wieclaw is a junior at North Tonawanda High School.