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Retired State Police Maj. Christopher L. Cummings has been named chief of security at Erie County Medical Center.

Cummings, who supervised about 450 sworn personnel and civilian employees as head of the New York State Police’s Troop A in Western New York, replaces Kevin Comerford, who left the post last year.

“After a lengthy search process, we are extremely pleased to get someone of Chris Cummings’ caliber,” said ECMC chief executive officer Jody L. Lomeo. “We look forward to Chris Cummings’ leadership as we continue our commitment to maintain the safest environment for our patients and visitors.”

Cummings, 53, played a key role in helping the Buffalo Police Department by providing resources in the effort to dismantle street gangs. He also provided state trooper patrols in the city’s high crime neighborhoods under Project Impact.

“After a fulfilling career with the State Police, I was looking for an organization that was focused on our community. ECMC is a perfect fit,” Cummings said. “I have watched for decades as ECMC’s Regional Trauma Unit, ER doctors and staff saved numerous lives and played a leadership role in our community, and I am proud to be part of the team.”

He is a 29-year veteran of the State Police.

Cummings’ duties will include a review and redesign of the hospital’s safety and security measures, according to ECMC officials.

Cummings remains active in a number of police organizations, including the New York State Executive Committee on Counter Terrorism, the Western New York Chiefs of Police Association, and the 100 Club of Buffalo.

He is also a board member of the Erie County Community College Alumni Association.

Rising through the ranks of the State Police, Cummings served as a lieutenant and zone captain in Canandaigua, and as captain of the Western Region Internal Affairs Bureau before becoming the highest-ranking state police official in this region as major.

He has also received six New York State Police Superintendent’s commendations, including one for his supervision of law enforcement in response to the crash of Colgan Air Flight 3407 in Clarence Center in 2009, which killed 50 people.

email: lmichel@buffnews.com