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At the ACBL Summer Championships in Philadelphia, the Grand National Teams final ended in drama. The defending champions from Florida (Becker-Spector, Berkowitz-Cohler, Meckstroth-Rodwell) trailed New York by four IMPs with one deal left.
At one table, North-South for New York bid and made six hearts. At the other, Berkowitz-Cohler for Florida made one cue bid too many (maybe more than one) and landed at a grand slam.
New York’s West, John Hurd, pondered his lead. East had doubled North’s spade cue bid, so Hurd figured his partner had the spades sewed up. Hurd saw no hurry to try to cash either ace: If he led one and saw it ruffed, he might set up winners for declarer.
So Hurd led a trump, a choice with which the hundreds of spectators on the Internet sympathized. But Cohler drew trumps, ran the spades (with a winning finesse) to pitch dummy’s clubs, and ruffed his losing club in dummy.
Making seven, and the title to Florida.
This week: Philly deals.
You hold: ´ K 6 5 ™ K J 9 © K Q 9 7 3 ® K 2. The dealer, at your right, opens one club. You bid one diamond, the next player raises to two clubs and two passes follow. What do you say?
A: Don’t sell out when partner is marked with values. (If he had none, the opponents would still be bidding.) Double for takeout. Try to push the opponents higher to give yourself a better chance for a plus on defense.
East dealer
E-W vulnerable

NORTH
´ K 6 5
™ K J 9
© K Q 9 7 3
® K 2
WEST EAST
´ 9 8 ´ Q 10 4
™ 10 4 ™ 3
© A J 5 4 © 10 8 6 2
® A Q J 10 3 ® 9 8 6 5 4
SOUTH
´ A J 7 3 2
™ A Q 8 7 6 5 2
© None
® 7
East South West North
Pass 1 ™ 2 ® 3 ®
4 ® 4 © Pass 4 ´
Dbl(!) Redbl Pass 5 ®
Pass 5 © Pass 5 ™
Pass 5 ´ Pass 5NT
Pass 7 ™ All Pass
Opening lead – Choose it