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“My partner and I need binding arbitration,” a club player said to me. “We’ll each put up $10, and you tell us who was wrong in this deal. The winner gets his money back, and you get the other $10.”
I wasn’t sure it was worth getting involved, but I listened to the facts. Against five clubs, West led his singleton diamond. South won in dummy and started the trumps (not best). West took his ace and did well to lead a spade, but when East won, he led … a heart. South claimed.
“I couldn’t tell your diamond lead was a singleton,” East argued. “If declarer had 1-1-4-7 distribution, we needed to take the ace of hearts before he threw his heart on dummy’s high spade.”
“Baloney,” West said. “If I had a second diamond and the ace of hearts, I’d have tried to cash my ace at Trick Three. If South ruffed, we’d lose only an overtrick.”
I sided with West (and walleted my $10). If West knew the defenders’ only chance was to win three aces, he would have made sure of taking them.

You hold: ´ K Q 6 5 4 ™ K 10 8 5 © A J 9 ® 10. Your partner opens one diamond, you respond one spade and he rebids two diamonds. What do you say?
A: Six diamonds might be a fine contract; partner might hold A 7, A 3, K Q 10 8 6 5, 7 6 5. But if he holds 7 3, 9 3, K Q 10 8 6 5, A K J, you should play at 3NT. Bid two hearts, forcing, planning to support the diamonds next to describe a good hand with shortness in clubs. Your partner can judge where to play.
South dealer
E-W vulnerable

NORTH
´ K Q 6 5 4
™ K 10 8 5
© A J 9
® 10

WEST EAST
´ J 8 7 2 ´ A 10 3
™ A Q 7 6 4 2 ™ J 9 3
© 5 © 10 8 7 3
® A 7 ® 9 5 4

SOUTH
´ 9
™ None
© K Q 6 4 2
® K Q J 8 6 3 2

South West North East
5 ® Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead – © 5