ADVERTISEMENT

In a fraternity-league football game, a quarterback told his team that if the signals included a color, the play would be a run; if a fruit, it would be a pass. So they lined up, and he barked out “25 … 16 … orange … hike!”
I hear players complain that they can’t trust anyone’s signals. Against today’s slam, West led the queen of trumps, and South took the king and ace. East discarded the ten of clubs, feigning possession of the king.
South then led the king and a low diamond. West discarded, not ruffing a loser, and South won with the ace but had only 11 tricks. Since he thought East had the king of clubs, South tried a heart to his jack next. Down one.
South can give himself two chances. He should continue with the queen of diamonds at Trick Five, pitching the jack of clubs. If West discards, South exits with a trump, and then if West leads a club, South can try a free finesse with the queen. If the finesse lost, South could ruff and finesse in hearts or, better, play to squeeze East.
You hold: ´ K 6 3 ™ K 5 4 © A Q 10 6 3 ® A Q. You open one diamond, your partner bids one spade, you jump to 2NT and he tries three hearts, What do you say?
A: Since you have tenaces in the minor suits, to insist on 3NT is tempting. But partner may want to know about your three-card spade support; he may have a shapely hand. Bid three spades. If partner’s pattern is 5-4-2-2, he can try 3NT next to let you choose a game.

South dealer
Both sides vulnerable

NORTH
´ K 6 3
™ K 5 4
© A Q 10 6 3
® A Q
WEST EAST
´ Q J 10 ´ 5
™ Q 10 8 ™ 6 3 2
© 7 © J 9 8 5 2
® K 7 6 5 3 2 ® 10 9 8 4
SOUTH
´ A 9 8 7 4 2
™ A J 9 7
© K 4
® J

South West North East
1 ´ Pass 3 © Pass
3 ´ Pass 3 NT Pass
4 ™ Pass 4 ´ Pass
6 ´ All Pass
Opening lead – ´ Q