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In an end play (my topic this week), you give an opponent the lead in a position where any lead will help you.
Today's West leads a diamond against six hearts, and since he would have no reason to lead from K-6-3 or Q-6-3, South suspects the lead is a singleton. He takes the ace, and East plays low.
South counts only 11 tricks: one diamond, five trumps, two spades, two clubs and a club ruff in dummy. He draws trumps with the A-J and considers finessing in clubs for a 12th trick. But if East held seven spades, one heart and three diamonds, he isn't likely to have the queen of clubs (and if he does, the queen will fall under the A-K anyway).
Instead, South discards diamonds on the A-K of spades, ruffs dummy's last spade, takes the A-K of clubs to pitch a diamond from dummy and leads the jack of clubs.
When West's queen covers, dummy discards another diamond. West must then lead another club, and South discards dummy's last diamond and ruffs in his hand.

You hold: None T A K Q 10 7 10 9 8 5 4 A K J. You open one heart, your partner responds one spade, you bid two diamonds and he rebids two spades. What do you say?
A: Misfit deals are cause for caution, and if your ace of hearts were a low heart, you would pass to avoid impending disaster. Even on the actual hand, a pass might be the winning action, but your extra strength justifies one more try for game. Bid three diamonds or 2NT.
East dealer
Both sides vulnerable

NORTH
A K 4
T J 9 8 5 3
A J 7 2
7

WEST EAST
8 6 2 Q J 10 9 7 5 3
T 4 2 T 6
3 K Q 6
Q 9 8 6 5 3 2 10 4

SOUTH
None
T A K Q 10 7
10 9 8 5 4
A K J

East South West North
3 4 T Pass 6 T
All Pass

Opening lead - 3