It's a look that comes and goes, but a new generation of women are showing that bow ties and ties aren't just for guys. Reality television star/model Kendall Jenner wears a bow tie on the cover of this month's Seventeen magazine. Singers Janelle Monae and Avril Lavigne have sported men's neckwear. And, as online retailer the Tie Bar ( further points out, designer Kate Spade even showed a bow tie print dress in her spring/summer 2013 collection.
Three tips from the Tie Bar:
. Go monochromatic: A woman can keep it subtle by matching the color of a tie or bow tie to a button-down shirt - or a shade of the same color. The tie will blend with her overall look, yet add a touch of "preppy class."
. Go bolder with print on print: From polka dot on floral, to stripes on chevron, this look makes a big statement.
. Go black and white, for "the classically cool": A chic black bow tie can be dressed up or down depending on the fabric and shape.

On the shelf

New for fashionistas: Three new titles from the Design Museum "Fifty" series: - "Fifty Fashion Looks That Changed the 1950s," "Fifty Fashion Looks That Changed the 1960s" and - you've got it - "Fifty Fashion Looks That Changed the 1970s" - all by Paula Reed (Conran Octopus, 112 pages each, $20 each, hardcover).
Guessing already? We'll get you started. Looks from the 1950s include Katharine Hepburn, Beatnik style, stilettoes and Barbie.
From the 1960s: fashion editor Diana Vreeland, Vidal Sassoon, Jackie Kennedy and Twiggy.
And from the 1970s: bell-bottoms, Lauren Hutton, Diane Keaton in "Annie Hall" (more neckties!) and Beverly Johnson, the Buffalo-born supermodel. Text and photographs accompany the 50 looks - be it a person, a style or an article of clothing - highlighted in each book.

And finally .

"Her fashion influence in those days should not be underestimated. What Sarah Jessica Parker is to young women today, Diane Keaton was in that day."
- Vogue contributing editor Andre Leon Talley, on actress Diane Keaton's "Annie Hall" look, in "Fifty Fashion Looks That Changed the 1970s" by Paula Reed.